Tag Archives: Algeria

Gazella atlantica Bourguinat

Atlantic Gazelle (Gazella atlantica)

This North African species was described in 1870 based on fossil remains that were dated to the Upper Pleistocene, however, some remains apparently turned out to be much younger, thus the species might have survived until about 3000 years BP..

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I was unfortunately unable to find any source for that assumption.

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edited: 18.10.2020

Mercuria globulina (Letourneux & Bourguignat)

Globule Mercuria Snail (Mercuria globulina)

The Globule Mercuria Snail was described in 1887, it is or was restricted to the central- and eastern parts of the Tell Atlas of Algeria and Tunisia. 

The shells reach sizes of about 0,25 to 0,3 cm in length. [1]

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I personally do not know now if it is indeed extinct, however, the species apparently has not been seen since the 19th century, was not found during recent surveys, and its name appears in lists of extinct molluscs.

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References:

[1] Peter Glöer; Slimane Bouzid; Hans D. Boeters: Revision of the genera Pseudamnicola Paulucci 1878 and Mercuria Boeters 1971 from Algeria with particular emphasis on museum collections. Archiv für Molluskenkunde 139(1): 1-22. 2010

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edited: 05.05.2019

Eudorcas rufina (Thomas)

Red Gazelle (Eudorcas rufina)  

The Red Gazelle is known from three specimens that were found on markets in northern Algeria in the late 19th century, which today are kept in museums in London, Great Britain and Paris, France.

It is a enigmatic taxon which in fact might not even be a true species, it is thus treated by the IUCN as Data Deficient.

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Depiction from: ‘H. A. Bryden: Great and small game of Africa: an account of the distribution, habits, and natural history of the sporting mammals, with personal hunting experiences. London: Rowland Ward, limited 1899’

(not in copyright)

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edited: 18.10.2020

Alcelaphus buselaphus ssp. buselaphus (Pallas)

North African Hartebeest (Alcelaphus buselaphus ssp. buselaphus 

The North African Hartebeest [which is a monotypic species in my opinion] was once widely distributed all over northern Africa, including Egypt, Algeria, Jordan, Libya, and Morocco, and occurred probably also in Palestine and some parts of Saudi Arabia.  

The animal reached a shoulder height of up to 1,5 m.  

The North African Hartebeest was already well known to the ancient Egyptians and the Romans and can be found depicted Roman mosaics.  

The species begun to disappear during the second half of the 19th century – due to direct hunting, especially during the French conquest of Algeria between 1830 and 1847, when thousands of the antelopes were killed by French soldiers just for amusement.  

The last known individual was shot in the year 1925 in Morocco.  

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Yet, the species may have survived in the wild for a longer time than previously known – some bones, found 1998 in the Dakhla Oasis in Egypt inside of an abandoned hyena burrow could be dated to about 1960.  

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References:  

[1] A. J. Mills: Report presented to the Supreme Council of Antiquities, Egypt, on the 2000 Season of the Dakhleh Oasis Projekt. Dakhleh Oasis Project SCA Report: 1999/2000 Season  

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Depiction from: ‘P. L. Sclater; O. Thomas: The Book of Antelopes. London: R. H. Porter 1894-1900’  

(not in copyright) 

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edited: 23.09.2017

Mercuria letourneuxiana (Bourguignat)

Letourneux’s Mercuria Snail (Mercuria letourneuxiana)

Letourneux’s Mercuria Snail was described in 1862, it is, or probably was restricted to thermal springs around the region of Annaba in the northeastern corner of Algeria.

The shells of this species reach sizes of about 0,22 to 0,26 cm in length. [1]

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A somewhat aberrant form was described as a distinct species, Bythinia desertorum Bourguignat. [1]

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Letourneux’s Mercuria Snail is now probably extinct.

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References:

[1] Peter Glöer; Slimane Bouzid; Hans D. Boeters: Revision of the genera Pseudamnicola Paulucci 1878 and Mercuria Boeters 1971 from Algeria with particular emphasis on museum collections. Archiv für Molluskenkunde 139(1): 1-22. 2010

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edited: 05.05.2019