Tag Archives: Amastridae

Laminella citrina ssp. semivenulata Borcherding 

Manawai Citrine Laminella Snail (Laminella citrina ssp. semivenulata)  

The Manawai Citrine Laminella Snail was described in 1906, originally as a distinct species, on the basis of specimens that were found at a place named Manawai in eastern Moloka‘i, Hawaiian Islands.

The shells reach sizes of about 1,8 cm in height; they are “sinistral, imperforate, sometimes distinctly perforate, rather solid, smooth (very finely striated longitudinally under the lens), somewhat shining, pale buff, figured with very small black spots, the upper whorls and the last one below the middle elegantly ornamented with black veined lines.” [1]

This form is now considered extinct.

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References:

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911

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edited: 02.06.2021

Amastra anthonii (Newcomb)

Anthoni’s Amastra Snail (Amastra anthonii)

Anthoni’s Amastra Snail was described in 1888, it was endemic to the island of Kaua’i, Hawaiian Islands, however, the exact locality appears to be unknown.

… from the original description.:

Shell conically ovate, solid, blackish-brown, longitudinally striate. Whorls 6, inflated, suture moderately impressed. Apex obtuse. Aperture obliquely ovate, subangulate below. Lip simple, thickened within. Columella short, straight, with a somewhat callous plication below the middle. White-banded below the suture, and of a dirty white in the umbilical region.” [1]

The shells reached sizes of about 1,6 to 1,8 cm in height.

***

syn. Achatinella anthonii Newcomb

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Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911′    

(public domain)

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References:  

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911

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edited: 06.10.2020

Amastra uniplicata ssp. vetuscula Cooke

Maunaloa Amastra Snail (Amastra uniplicata ssp. vetuscula)

The Maunaloa Amastra Snail was described in 1917; it is known from (sub)fossil remains that were recovered from Late Pleistocene/Early Holocene deposits near the northern shore of Molokai’, Hawaiian Islands.

A very few imperfect specimens were found by Pilsbry and Cooke in 1913 at Moomomi where this variety is extremely rare. Further west, especially in the shifting sands, it occurs more abundantly but is not a common species in any locality. it has been found sparingly in all the known fossil deposits from Puukapele west to the shifting sands. This variety is readily separated from the typical form by its less tumid last whorl, more cylindrical form and malleate surface.” [1]

The shells reach sizes of about 1,8 to 2 cm in height.

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Photo from: ‘C. Montague Cooke: Some new species of Amastra. Bishop Museum Occasional Papers 3(3): 1-34. 1917’

(public domain)

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References:

[1] C. Montague Cooke: Some new species of Amastra. Bishop Museum Occasional Papers 3(3): 1-34. 1917

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edited: 04.05.2022

Amastra montivaga Cooke

Mountain-wandering Amastra Snail (Amastra montivaga)

The Mountain-wandering Amastra Snail was described in 1917; it was found on the Kalihi Ridge, which is a mountainous region on the island of O’ahu, Hawaiian Islands.

“A. montivaga is undoubtedly a dirivative [sic] of A. textilis. It differs from the latter species by its smaller size, thinner shell, more convex whorls (which are shouldered below), deeper sutures, etc.” [1]

The shells of this species reach sizes of 1,2 to 1,6 cm in height.

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Photo from: ‘C. Montague Cooke: Some new species of Amastra. Bishop Museum Occasional Papers 3(3): 1-34. 1917’

(public domain)

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References:

[1] C. Montague Cooke: Some new species of Amastra. Bishop Museum Occasional Papers 3(3): 1-34. 1917

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edited: 04.05.2022

Amastra seminigra Hyatt & Pilsbry

Coal-black Amastra Snail (Amastra seminigra)

The Coal-black Amastra Snail, described in 1911, was restricted to the vicinity of Wahiawa and Waimano near Honolulu on the island of O’ahu, Hawaiian Islands.

It was a quite large species whose shells reached heights of up to 2,12 cm.

The species is very similar to the Sorrowful Amastra Snail (Amastra tristis (Férussac)) and differs from that species only by its narrower shape at all stages of growth.

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Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911′    

(public domain)

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References:

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911

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edited: 05.10.2020

Amastra ricei ssp. armillata Cooke

Milolii Amastra Snail (Amastra ricei ssp. armillata)

The Milolii Amastra Snail was described in 1917 based on two (sub)fossil specimens that had been collected from the Miloli’i beach at the north-western coast of Kaua’i, Hawaiian Islands, from deposits that might be of late Pleistocene or Early Holocene age.

This form may in fact not be different from the typical species.

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Depiction from: ‘C. Montague Cooke: Some new species of Amastra. Bishop Museum Occasional Papers 3(3): 1-34. 1917’

(public domain)

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References:

[1] C. Montague Cooke: Some new species of Amastra. Bishop Museum Occasional Papers 3(3): 1-34. 1917

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edited: 16.05.2022

Amastra umbilicata ssp. pluscula Cooke

Kaupulehu Amastra Snail (Amastra umbilicata ssp. pluscula)

The Kaupulehu Amastra Snail, described in 1917, is known from subfossil material that was found at Ka’ūpūlehu at elevations of about 5500 m above sea level in northern Kona on the island of Hawai’i.

This species is very common in its fossil state along the government road between Waimea and North Kona. A number of the specimens have such a fresh appearence [sic] that it does not seem possible that they have been very long dead. Most of the specimens were found in earth under lava blocks. It differs principally from A. ultima by its larger size and less convex whorls. This varietly differs from typical A. umbilicata morticina not only by its larger umbilicus but also by its proportionally wider and larger aperture which is not distinctly angled below, and is much less developed columellar fold.” [1]

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Photo from: ‘C. Montague Cooke: Some new species of Amastra. Bishop Museum Occasional Papers 3(3): 1-34. 1917’

(public domain)

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References:

[1] C. Montague Cooke: Some new species of Amastra. Bishop Museum Occasional Papers 3(3): 1-34. 1917

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edited: 04.05.2022

Amastra johnsoni Hyatt & Pilsbry

Johnson’s Amastra Snail (Amastra johnsoni)

Johnson’s Amastra Snail was described in 1911; it was found in Wailuku in the northeastern part of western Maui, Hawaiian Islands.

The shells of this species reach heights of about 1,1 cm; they are nearly imperforate, oblong-conic, rather thin and somewhat glossy, the outlines of the spire are straight above, a little convex below and the whorls nearly flat, they are brown with the last whorl being partially covered with a thin, darker cuticle that has some darker and lighter streaks but no oblique or angular markings. [1]

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Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a. o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911’  

(public domain)

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References:

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a. o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911

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edited: 16.05.2022

Newcombia pfeifferi ssp. decorata Pilsbry & Cooke

Decorated Newcombia Snail (Newcombia pfeifferi ssp. decorata)

The Decorated Newcombia Snail was described in 1912, it is, or rather was, endemic to the island of Moloka’i, Hawaiian Islands.

There is obviously no further information available about this species.

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References:

[1] Mike Severns: A new species of newcombia from the Pleistocene of Kaua’i, Hawaiian Islands, USA (Gastropoda, Pulmonata, Achatinellidae). Basteria 73: 57-60. 2009

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edited: 16.05.2020

Amastra fragosa Cooke

Uneven Amastra Snail (Amastra fragosa)

The Uneven Amastra Snail was described in 1917; it is known from (sub)fossil remains that had been recovered from Late Pleistocene/Early Holocene deposits near Ka’ūpūlehu, in Kona, Hawai’i.

The shells reached average sizes of 1,1 to 1,3 cm in height.

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References:

[1] C. Montague Cooke: Some new species of Amastra. Bishop Museum Occasional Papers 3(3): 1-34. 1917

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Photo from: ‘C. Montague Cooke: Some new species of Amastra. Bishop Museum Occasional Papers 3(3): 1-34. 1917’

(public domain)

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edited: 16.05.2022

Amastra flemingi Cooke

Fleming’s Amastra Snail (Amastra flemingi)

Fleming’s Amastra Snail was described in 1917 based on three (sub)fossil shells that were recovered from deposits near the southern coast of eastern Maui, which may date to a Late Pleistocene or Early Holocene age.

The shell of the holotype reaches a height of about 1,3 cm, “The shell is indistinctly rimate, sinitral, oblong-turrite, in its fossil state whitish. The spire is elongate, faintly contracted above, with slightly convex outlines.” [1]

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References:

[1] C. Montague Cooke: Some new species of Amastra. Bishop Museum Occasional Papers 3(3): 1-34. 1917

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Depiction from: ‘C. Montague Cooke: Some new species of Amastra. Bishop Museum Occasional Papers 3(3): 1-34. 1917’

(public domain)

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edited: 16.05.2022

Carelia olivacea ssp. olivacea Pease

Olive Carelia Snail (Carelia olivacea ssp. olivacea)

The Olive Carelia Snail was described in 1866; it was found in the eastern part of Kaua’i, Hawaiian Islands and seems to have once be quite widespread.

The shells reach heights of about 7 cm.

Fire and cattle have played havoc with most of the native forests along the northern side of this range and probably the original localities from which Pease obtained his material have been destroyed.” [2]

***

syn. Carelia olivacea ssp. variabilis Pease

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References:  

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911
[2] C. Montague Cooke Jr.: The land snail genus Carelia. Bishop Museum Bulletin 85: 1-97. 1931

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edited: 25.01.2024

Leptachatina obtusa (Pfeiffer)

Obtuse Leptachatina Snail (Leptachatina obtusa)

This species was described in 1855; it was endemic to the island of O’ahu, Hawaiian Islands.

The shells reach heights of about 1 cm; they are “imperforate, oblong, nearly smooth, glossy, pellucid, chestnut-corneous ….” [1]

The species is now extinct.

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References:   

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911

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edited: 15.01.2024

Amastra pellucida Baldwin

Translucent Amastra Snail (Amastra pellucida)

The Translucent Amastra Snail was described in 1895, it was restricted to the Wai’anae Valley on the island of O’ahu, Hawaiian Islands.

The species is named for the thin pellucid (translucent) texture of its shell, and it is one of only a few of which we know at least a little bit about the animal itself.:

Animal of a uniform brown color; the head above and tentacles of a darker shade. the action of the heart is plainly visible through the thin texture of the shell. When first collected the pulsations were about fifty per minute, growing slower and fainter from day to day until the animal died.” [1]

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References:

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911

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Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a. o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911’

(public domain)

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edited: 28.09.2020

Leptachatina terebralis (Gulick)

Kawailoa Leptachatina Snail (Leptachatina fulgida)

The Kawailoa Leptachatina Snail was described in 1856; it was restricted t a small region within the Wai’anae Mountains on the island of O’ahu, Hawaiian Islands.

The shells are about 1.1 cm heigh; they are shiny dark brown and very finely striated, the apex is white. [1]

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Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911’   

(public domain)

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References:   

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911

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edited: 15.01.2024

Amastra thurstoni ssp. bembicodes Cooke

Small Thurston’s Amastra Snail (Amastra thurstoni ssp. bembicodes)

This form differs from the nominate form by its smaller size, its compact and closely coiled spire, but especially in its smoother surface marked with finer and more distantly spaced growth-wrinkles. [1]

This is an exceedingly rare form of Amastra. the results of five findings are six whole and three broken specimens. Among the large number of Amastras that have been taken in the Manoa fossil deposits, from the beginning of Oahu Avenue to Awapuhi Street, this form was only taken from four “pockets”.” [1]

These deposits appear to be actually Late Pleistocene to early Holocene in age.

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References:

[1] C. Montague Cooke: New species of Amastridae. Bishop Museum Occasional Papers 10(6): 1-29. 1933

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edited: 04.05.2022

Leptachatina laevis Pease

Brown Kauaian Leptachatina Snail (Leptachatina laevis)

This species was described in 1869; it was restricted to the island of Kaua’i, Hawaiian Islands.

The shells reached heights of 0.9 to 0.95 cm; they were ovately oblong, imperforate, dextral, somewhat thin, smooth, glossy and dark brown colored.

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Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911’   

(public domain)

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References:   

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911

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edited: 14.01.2024

Newcombia pfeifferi (Newcomb)

Pfeiffer’s Newcombia Snail (Newcombia pfeifferi)

Pfeiffer’s Newcombia Snail was described in 1853, it inhabited the rainforests at the higher elevations in the center of Moloka’i, Hawaiian Islands.

The shells reach sizes of 1,5 to 1,7 cm in height. [1]

***

Pfeiffer’s Newcombia Snail is now considered extinct.

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References:

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 22: Achatinellidae. 1912-1914

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Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 22: Achatinellidae. 1912-1914′

(public domain)

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edited: 04.06.2021

Leptachatina fulgida Cooke

Flashing Leptachatina Snail (Leptachatina fulgida)

The Flashing Leptachatina Snail was described in 1911; it was found on the slopes of Pu’u Kukui and P’u Lihau in the western part of Maui, Hawaiian Islands.

The shell reaches heights of about 0.7 cm; they are imperforate, elongately ovately conic and beautifully glossy greenish yellow colored, except for the embryonic whorls which are whitish, the outer lip is dark brownish.

The species is considered extinct now.

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Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911’   

(public domain)

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References:   

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911

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edited: 15.01.2024

Leptachatina emerita Sykes

Kalamaula Leptachatina Snail (Leptachatina emerita)

This species was described in 1900; it was endemic to the island of Moloka’i, Hawaiian Islands.

The shells reach heights of about 0.8 cm; according to the species’ author they are “variable in color, shading from brown to a hyaline tint; adult specimens lose their gloss and become of a straw-yellow. The columellar plait is small and inconspicuous.” [1]

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Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911’  

(public domain)  

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References:  

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911  

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edited: 22.01.2024

Leptachatina sandwicensis (Pfeiffer)

Sandwich Islands Leptachatina Snail (Leptachatina sandwicensis)

This species was described in 1846; it was endemic to the Wai’anae Mountains on the island of O’ahu, Hawaiian Islands.

The shells are about 0.78 cm heigh; they are “ovately conic, obliquely striate, subopaque, dirty corneous; spire conic, somewhat obtuse; suture marginated with an impressed line ….” [1]

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Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911’   

(public domain)

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References:   

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911

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edited: 14.01.2024

Amastra flavescens ssp. saxicola Baldwin

Southern Yellowish Amastra Snail (Amastra flavescens ssp. saxicola)

The Southern Yellowish Amastra Snail is a form of the Yellowish Amastra Snail (Amastra flavescens(Newcomb)), from the far south of the island of Hawai’i, it was found on an ancient aa (lava) flow at the foothills of the Mauna Lao volcano in the Ka’u District.

This form differs from the nominate race by its more convex whorls of which the last one is rounded peripherally. [1]

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References:

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol. 23: Appendix to Amastridae. Tornatellinidae. Index, vols. XXI-XXIII. 1915-1916

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edited: 15.06.2020

Amastra conifera Smith

Kula Amastra Snail (Amastra conifera)

The Kula Amastra Snail was described 1873; it inhabited the forests around Kula in the northern part of eastern Maui, Hawaiian Islands, where it usually was found under dead leaves on the ground.

The shells reached sizes of up to 1,7 cm in height; they are ovate-conic, dextral, lightly striated with lines of growth, they are very pale reddish and partly covered with a brownish-olivaceous epidermis. [1]

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References:

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a. o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911

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Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a. o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911’

(public domain)

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edited: 16.05.2022

Laminella picta (Mighels)

Decorated Laminella Snail (Laminella picta)  

The Decorated Laminella Snail was described in 1845; it is, or rather was, endemic to the island of Maui, Hawaiian Islands.

The shells reach sizes of about 1,43 to 1,6 cm in height; they mostly are opaque white and are decorated with small dark dots.

***
This is one of the few Hawaiian snail species of which we know at least a little something about the animal itself.:

“… densely black, surface checkered by fine lines of a light color; tentacles slate, much produced; mantle and bottom of foot brownish-black; when extended same length as the shell.” [1]

***

The species is now considered extinct.

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References:

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911

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Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911’ 

(public domain)

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edited: 02.06.2021

Amastra nucleola (Gould)

Nut-shaped Amastra Snail (Amastra nucleola)

The Nut-shaped Amastra Snail was described in 1893, it was restricted to lowland areas around the Hanalei Bay at the northern coast of the island of Kaua’i, Hawaiian Islands.

The shells reach sizes of about 1 to 1,1 cm in height and 0,69 cm in diameter.

… from the original description.:

A small solid species, of a livid hue, whitish at the tip and the neighborhood of the suture, and milk-white just before the termination of the whorl at the aperture (Gld.).” [1]

***

The Nut-shaped Amastra Snail may have gone extinct already in the middle of the 19th century, since all specimens known to exist appear to have been collected dead. [1]  

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References:

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911

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edited: 12.03.2021

Newcombia perkinsi Sykes

Perkin’s Newcombia Snail (Newcombia perkinsi)

Perkin’s Newcombia Snail apparently was restricted to the Makakupaia Valley on the island of Moloka’i, Hawaiian Islands, this place is now highly degraded and overgrown by introduced vegetation.

The shells have a size of 2,1 cm in height. [1]

***

Perkin’s Newcombia Snail is now considered extinct.

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References:

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 22: Achatinellidae. 1912-1914

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Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 22: Achatinellidae. 1912-1914′  

(public domain)  

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edited: 04.06.2021

Laminella citrina (Mighels)

Citrine Laminella Snail (Laminella citrina)

The Citrine Laminella Snail was described in 1848, it was restricted to the island of Moloka’i, Hawaiian Islands, where it did inhabit a narrow area on the ridge of the island south of the northern peninsula.

The shells reached sizes of 1,6 to 1,75 cm in height; the usually have a uniformly light yellowish color, sometimes becoming darker on the last whorl, some shells bear various dots on their neanic whorls. [1]

***

This is one of the few Hawaiian snail species of which we know a little bit about the animals themselves.:

Animal of a uniform light yellow color, superior tentacles and tentacular sheath light slate.” [1]

***

Like most terrestrial Hawaiian snail species, also this one is now extinct.

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References:

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911  

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Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911’  

(public domain) 

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edited: 02.06.2021

Leptachatina subula (Gulick)

Awl-shaped Leptachatina Snail (Leptachatina fulgida)

This species was described in 1856; it inhabited the Pālolo- and Wai’alae Valleys near the coast of south-eastern O’ahu, Hawaiian Islands.

The shells reach heights of about 1.1 cm; they are translucent, shiny dark corneous and very finely striated. [1]

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Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911’   

(public domain)

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References:   

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911

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edited: 15.01.2024

Laminella straminea (Reeve)

Straw-colored Laminella Snail (Laminella straminea)

The Straw-colored Laminella Snail was described in 1850; it was endemic to the island of O’ahu in the Hawaiian Islands, where it is known from several valleys, including the Makiki-, Nu’uanu-, Palolo-, Pauoa, and Waiala’e nui Valleys. The species was almost entirely found on the leaves of the endemic olonā (Touchardia latifolia Gaudich.). [1]

The shells reach sizes of about 2,2 to 2,4 cm in height; they are “acuminately oblong, sinistral, whorls convex, obliquely striated, columella strongly twist-plaited; straw-colored, unspotted.” [1]

We have a little information about the animal itself.:

Animal of a uniform light flesh color, oral aperture margined with a line of orange.” [1]

***

This species is now considered most likely extinct.

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References:

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911

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Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911’

(public domain) 

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edited: 02.06.2021

Amastra sericea ssp. anaglypta Cooke

Carved Amastra Snail (Amastra sericea ssp. anaglypta)

The Carved Amastra Snail was described in 1917; it was found in the forests of Punalu’u near the north-eastern shore of O’ahu, Hawaiian Islands

The shells reach sizes of 1,4 to 1,7 cm in height.

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References:

[1] C. Montague Cooke: Some new species of Amastra. Bishop Museum Occasional Papers 3(3): 1-34. 1917

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Photo from: ‘C. Montague Cooke: Some new species of Amastra. Bishop Museum Occasional Papers 3(3): 1-34. 1917’

(public domain)

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edited: 04.05.2022

Amastra nana Baldwin

Small Amastra Snail (Amastra nana)

The Small Amastra Snail was described in 1895; it inhabited the floors of the forests of Makawao in the northern part of eastern Maui, Hawaiian Islands, where it was once considered common, but very local in its distribution.

The animal was described when it was alive.:

Animal when extended in motion as long as the shell. Mantle light brown. Foot above and below brown with spots of deeper shade on the sides. Tentacles and front above almost black.” [1]

The shells reach sizes of about 1,1 to 1,2 cm in height; their coloration was quite variable.

*********************

References:

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a. o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911

*********************

Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a. o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911’

(public domain)

*********************

edited: 16.05.2022

Leptachatina exilis (Gulick)

Exiled Leptachatina Snail (Leptachatina exilis)

This species was described in 1856; it was apparently restricted to the Ka’a’awa Valley near the north-eastern shore of O’ahu, Hawaiian Island, where it was found “under stones in places not shaded by trees.” [1]

The shells reached heights of only about 0.6 cm; they were very thin, glassy transparent, shining, and scarcely striated.

*********************

Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911’   

(public domain)

*********************   

References:   

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911

*********************

edited: 15.01.2024

Amastra rubida Gulick

Glowing Red Amastra Snail (Amastra rubida)

The Glowing Red Amastra Snail was found at a place named Kahuku, probably in the northeastern part of O’ahu, Hawaiian Islands, where it was found on the ground in the forest. [1]

… from the original description.: 

It is allied to Am. elliptica Gk., but differs in being more elongate in form, thicker iin structure, and for the most part destitute of epidermis. It is always dextral.

*********************

References:

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911

*********************

Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911′

(public domain)

*********************

edited: 06.10.2020

Amastra forbesi Cooke

Forbes’ Amastra Snail (Amastra forbesi)

Forbe’s Amastra Snail was described in 1917; it is known only from (sub)fossil remains found in Late Pleistocene/Early Holocene deposits near the Makua beach at the foot of the Wai’anae Mountains on the island of O’ahu, Hawaiian Islands.

The material on which this species is based consists of two whole adult specimens and the lower portion of two additional specimens. all the specimens were taken by Mr. Forbes in a single pocket in sand deposits along the railroad track north of Makua. On a later visit by Mr. Forbes and the author, no additional specimens were found though all the exposed surfaces of the sand pockets along the track were carefully gone over. These pockets consist of beach sand covered by talus.” [1]

The shells of this species reach sizes of about 1,3 to 1,4 cm in height.

*********************

References:

[1] C. Montague Cooke: Some new species of Amastra. Bishop Museum Occasional Papers 3(3): 1-34. 1917

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Photo from: ‘C. Montague Cooke: Some new species of Amastra. Bishop Museum Occasional Papers 3(3): 1-34. 1917’

(public domain)

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edited: 04.05.2022

Amastra humilis ssp. moomomiensis Pilsbry & Cooke

Moomomi Amastra Snail (Amastra humilis ssp. moomomiensis)

The Mo’omomi beach at the northwestern coast of Moloka’i, Hawaiian Islands, is one of the last remaining dune sides found on these islands; thousands of shells poke out of the sandstone cliffs near the beach, some bleached completely, some still bearing hints of their former coloration; these are the shells of land snails that formerly inhabited this now quite desert-like place.

In the Pleistocene, the climate of the Hawaiian Islands was much wetter than it is today and the area that is now covered by sand dunes was forested back then. When the climate became dryer at the beginning of the Holocene about 10000 BP., these forests disappeared, leading to the extinction of the local snail populations.

In fact, the shells can be dated to ages from 42000 to about 3000 years, which means that this form died out during the Holocene, and, that this is a case of a natural extinction.

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Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 23: Appendix to Amastridae. Tornatellinidae. Index, vols. XXI-XXIII. 1915-1916

(public domain)

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edited: 31.10.2020

Laminella remyi (Newcomb)

Remy’s Laminella Snail (Laminella remyi)

Remy’s Laminella Snail was described in 1855; it was endemic to the island of Lana’i in the Hawaiian Islands. 

The shells reach sizes of about 1,4 cm in height; they are “… very pale buff, with some pink suffusion on the last whorl and the embryonic whorls. The first half-whorl is smooth, convex and uniform pinkish-brown; next whorl streaked, flattened ad unevenly, rather weakly costate; on part of the third whorl the costation or corrugation is stronger, more or less irregular, after that weakening. The last whorl is very finely striatulate. There are reddish streaks between the ribs on the embryonic whorls; near the end of the third whorl these give place to a few widely-spaced oblique blackish stripes; after which the angular, zigzag or netted pattern begins. This pattern is essentially like that of L. tetrao. The interior of the aperture and the columella are pink; columellar lamella simple, steeply ascending.” [1]

***

The species is now considered extinct.

*********************

References:

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911

*********************

Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911’ 

(public domain) 

*********************  

edited: 02.06.2021

Leptachatina cookei Pilsbry

Cooke’s Leptachatina Snail (Leptachatina cookei)

Cooke’s Leptachatina Snail was described in 1914, it is known only from subfossil specimens that had been found at a few scattered locations in western O’ahu, Hawaiian Islands. [1]

This was apparently a coastal, respectively lowland species and thus disappeared shortly after the arrival of the first Polynesian settlers.

*********************

References:

[1] Patrick V. Kirch; Carl C. Christensen: Nonemarine molluscs and paleoecology at Barber’s Point, O’ahu. Prepared for Archaeological Research Center Hawaii, Inc.. Department of Anthropology; Bernice P. Bishop Museum 1-40. 1980

*********************

edited: 22.04.2019

Amastra cornea (Newcomb)

Horn-like Amastra Snail (Amastra cornea)

This species inhabited the forests of the Mt. Ka’ala and parts of the Wai’anae Mountains on the island of O’ahu, Hawaiian Islands.

… from the species’ description.:

Shell irregularely, acutely conical, the apex ponted; last whorl inflated; thin, corneous, with minute longitudinal striae; whorls 7, rounded; aperture subovate; lip thin, translucent; columella straight, white, and armed with a transverse plaited tooth. Color uniform dark horn, columella and tooth white.” [1]

The shells reach sizes of 1,1 to 1,75 in heigth and up to 0,85 cm in diameter.

*********************    

References:

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911

*********************

Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911′  

(public domain) 

*********************

edited: 02.11.2020

Leptachatina exoptabilis Cooke

Desirable Leptachatina Snail (Leptachatina exoptabilis)

The Desirable Leptachatina Snail was described in 1911; it is known from two subfossil shells that were found at Lē’ahi (Diamond Head) in the south-eastern part of O’ahu, Hawaiian Islands.

This shells reach a height of about 0.78 cm.

The description is based on two specimens one of which is not adult and is slightly broken. it is most closely related to L. exilis Gul. from the same island. L. exoptabilis is, however, larger, with less convex outlines and is narrower in proportion to its length.” [1]

*********************

Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911’   

(public domain)

*********************   

References:   

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911

*********************

edited: 15.01.2024

Amastra praeopima Cooke

Waiahole Amastra Snail (Amastra praeopima)

This species was described in 1917; it was found at a place named Waiahole at the crest of the Ko’olau Mountains along the eastern coast of O’ahu, Hawaiian Islands.

The shells of this species reach sizes of about 1 to 1,2 cm in height.

*********************

References:

[1] C. Montague Cooke: Some new species of Amastra. Bishop Museum Occasional Papers 3(3): 1-34. 1917

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Photo from: ‘C. Montague Cooke: Some new species of Amastra. Bishop Museum Occasional Papers 3(3): 1-34. 1917’

(public domain)

*********************

edited: 04.05.2022

Leptachatina saxatilis (Gulick)

Rock-dwelling Leptachatina Snail (Leptachatina saxatilis)

The Rock-dwelling Leptachatina Snail was described in 1856; it is known from Mokulē’ia near the north-western shore of O’ahu, Hawaiian Islands, where it was found under stones in open places.

The shells are only about 0.6 cm heigh; they are glass-like transparent, shining, and very finely striated.

*********************

Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911’   

(public domain)

*********************   

References:   

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911

*********************

edited: 15.01.2024

Amastra rugulosa ssp. annosa Cooke

Aged Amastra Snail (Amastra rugulosa ssp. annosa)

The Aged Amastra Snail is one of many forms of its genus that are actually known only based on (sub)fossil material; this one was found in deposits of the Hanama’ulu plains near the eastern coast of Kaua’i, Hawaiian Islands.

This extremely variable form is abundant in road cuttings on the coastal plain south of the Wailua river. There are several distinct forms found associated in the different deposits. The typical form described above might be considered a distinct species if it did not occur with numerous intergrades of other forms which closely approach A. rugulosa normalis. A constant differentiating character between all these specimens of annosa and normalis is the very weak, oblique, deeply situated columellar fold of the former. Some of the specimens of annosa at first glance seem to belong to the subgenus Cyclamastra but the embryonic whorls are less convex than those of any species of this subgenus.” [1]

*********************

References:

[1] C. Montague Cooke: Some new species of Amastra. Bishop Museum Occasional Papers 3(3): 1-34. 1917

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Photo from: ‘C. Montague Cooke: Some new species of Amastra. Bishop Museum Occasional Papers 3(3): 1-34. 1917’

(public domain)

*********************

edited: 04.05.2022

Newcombia canaliculata (Baldwin)

Channeled Newcombia Snail (Newcombia canaliculata)

The Channeled Newcombia Snail was described in 1905, it was restricted to the easternmost part of Moloka’i, Hawaiian Islands.

The author gave some information about the live animal.:

Animal when extended in motion as long as the shell. Mantle slate color, margined with brown. Foot light slate, studded on the sides and head above with spots of deeper shade. Tentacles short and slender, dark slate.” [1]

***

The species is now considered extinct.

*********************

References:

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 22: Achatinellidae. 1912-1914

*********************

Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 22: Achatinellidae. 1912-1914′ 

(public domain) 

*********************

edited: 04.06.2021

Amastra textilis ssp. kaipaupauensis Hyatt & Pilsbry

Kaipaupau Amastra Snail (Amastra textilis ssp. kaipaupauensis

The Kaipaupau Amastra Snail was described in 1911, as far as I understand, it is known from a single specimen that was collected at a place named Kaipaupau, which may actually be the area around the Kaipapa’u Waterfall near the northeastern coast of O’ahu, Hawaiian Islands.  

***

… from the description.:

The shell is short, subperforate, thin, with straightly conic spire and convex whorls, the last quite rotund; dull purplish-brown, the thin cuticle yellowish on theearly whorls. Embryo finely striate; later whorls with fine, irregular sculpture of growth-wrinkles. Aperture purplish within, the lip very narrowly thickened. Columnellar lamella thin, its lower edge subhorizontal. 
….
Near The above, yet with narrower, straightly conic spire and more convex whorls. ….
” [1]

The shell has a length of 1,1 cm and reaches 0,7 cm in diameter.

*********************

References:

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911

*********************

Depiction from: ‘ George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911’

(public domain)

*********************

edited: 26.04.2019

Leptachatina turrita (Gulick)

Towered Leptachatina Snail (Leptachatina turrita)

The Towered Leptachatina Snail was described in 1856; it was apparently restricted to a small area named Lihue near the southern foots of the Wai’anae Mountains on the island of O’ahu, Hawaiian Islands.

The shells reach sizes of about 0.9 cm; they are translucent dark corneous and finely striated. [1]

*********************

Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911’   

(public domain)

*********************   

References:   

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911

*********************

edited: 15.01.2024

Carelia anceophila Cooke

Olokeke Carelia Snail (Carelia anceophila)

This species was described in 1931; it is known from at least two specimens that were found along the so-called Olokeke trail (a place that I cannot trace) on the island of Kaua’i, Hawaiian Islands; the specimens, when found, had only been dead for a short time.

The shells must have reached heights of up to 3.8 cm, maybe more. [1]

*********************  

References:  

[1] C. Montague Cooke Jr.: The land snail genus Carelia. Bishop Museum Bulletin 85: 1-97. 1931

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edited: 24.01.2024

Leptachatina scutilus (Mighel)

Slender Leptachatina Snail (Leptachatina scutilus)

This species, described in 1845, was restricted to the Wai’anae Mountains on the island of O’ahu, Hawaiian Islands.

The type specimens appear to have been destroyed and C. Montague Cooke, while assigning some specimens to Jesse Wedgwood Mighels’ description, writes the following statement.:

It is with some hesitation that I refer shells to this species. Mighel’s description is incomplete and the types were probably lost in the fire which destroyed part of his collection as no trace can be found of this species.

My specimens are slightly larger than Mighel’s measurements and have an additional whorl. The measurements of an average specimen are: Length 7.0, diam. 2.3, alt. of ap. 2.3 mm.
” [1]

*********************

Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911’   

(public domain)

*********************   

References:   

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911

*********************

edited: 14.01.2024

Leptachatina accincta (Mighels)

Girded Leptachatina Snail (Leptachatina accincta)

The Girded Leptachatina Snail was described in 1845; it is known to have inhabited parts of the Wai’anae Mountains on the island of O’ahu, Hawaiian Islands.

The shells reach heights of about 0.6 to 0.7 cm; they are “dextral, conical, horn color, smooth, polished, imperforate; whorls six, convex, with an impressed revolving line just below the suture; aperture semiovate; lip simple acute.” [1]

***

Note: This species is very often found under the name Leptachatina accineta (Mighels), which is a writing error.

*********************

Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911’   

(public domain)

*********************   

References:   

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911

*********************

edited: 15.01.2024

Amastra textilis ssp. textilis (Férussac)

Woven Amastra Snail (Amastra textilis ssp. textilis)

The Woven Amastra Snail was described in 1824, it appears to have been quite widespread around the center of southern O’ahu, Hawaiian Islands and indeed has repeatedly been described independently by several authors under a bunch of different names.

The shells are quite variable and reach sizes of 1,25 to 1,8 cm in heigth and 0,8 to 0,95 cm in diameter. [1]

At least three distinct subspecies have been described.

*********************

References:

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911

*********************

Depiction from: ‘ George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911’

(public domain)

*********************

edited: 27.09.2020

Amastra thaanumi Hyatt & Pilsbry

Thaanum’s Amastra Snail (Amastra thaanumi

Thaanum’s Amastra Snail was described in 1911, it was restricted to a place named Ka’a’awa in the Koʻolauloa District on the northeastern coast of O’ahu, Hawaiian Islands.

The species was described on the basis of a single living specimen and several dead shells.

… from the description.:

The shell is sinistral, imperforate, moderately solid, oblong, having a somewhat silky luster. Spire widely conic with somewhat convex outlines and rather obtuse summit. Embryonic whorls marked with faint, very fine growth-striae only; later whorls distinctly striate obliquely, the striae fine and somewhat thread-like. Upper whorls purplish-brown ith irregular whitish streaks, the last two whorls covered with a rich dark chestnut cuticle, yellowish next the suture, and deciduous in front of the aperture, showing a glossy light green under layer. Aperture rather oblique, livid or bluish white whithin, with a whitish callous rim within the dark-edged lip. Columella short, bearing a strong, triangular, downward-bent lamella. Parietal callus thin.

*********************

References:

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911

*********************

Depiction from: ‘ George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911’

(public domain)

*********************

edited: 28.09.2020

Laminella venusta (Mighels)

Graceful Laminella Snail (Laminella venusta 

The Graceful Laminella Snail was described in 1845, it was found in the Mapulehu Valley near the southeastern coast of Moloka’i, Hawaiian Islands.

This species differs from the congeneric Alexander’s Laminella Snail (Laminella alexandri (Newcomb)) and the Depicted Laminella Snail (Laminella depicta (Baldwin)) by its more swollen last whorl and the sunken black markings, which are generally coarser than in L. depicta and which do not form the characteristic patterns.

The shells reach sizes of about 1,35 cm in heigth and 0,62 to 0,73 in diameter.

The animal itself is also mentioned in the description.:

The animal … is slender, body flesh-color with black puncta down the sides; tentacles very black. When extended, two-thirds as long as the shell.” [1]

***

The Graceful Laminella Snail has three additional color morphs assigned to it, orginally described as varieties, which in fact may well be distinct subspecies: var. muscaria Hyatt & Pilsbry, var. orientalis Hyatt & Pilsbry, var. semivestita Hyatt & Pilsbry. [1]

*********************

References:

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911

*********************

Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911’ 

(public domain)

*********************  

edited: 01.10.2020

Amastra ricei Cooke

Rice’s Amastra Snail (Amastra ricei)

Rice’s Amastra Snail was described in 1917, apparently based on only five recently dead specimens, it was restricted to a small part of the Miloli’i Valley near the northwestern coast of Kaua’i.

The shells reached sizes of about 2,4 cm in heigth and 1,2 to 1,3 cm in diameter.

***

The author of the species also described a variety, named as var. armillata, from the same locality, based on two dead specimens (empty shells) which may be of Pleistocene age or may just have been old surface shells.

This variety differs from the normal form in the following way …:

… the fourth and fifth whorls are slightly swollen, and the surface is more coarsely but not as closely sculptured with growth-wrinkles. The periphery is distinctly carinated on the last whorl; the carina is margined along its upper edge by a deep narrow sinus. The lower halff of the last whorl descends rather rapidly, with the carina appearing slightly above the suture. The outer margin of the aperture is distinctly modified by the carina. The upper portion being flattened, the lower evenly arched. The columellar fold is weak, thread-like, very oblique and deeply situated.” [1]

*********************

References:

[1] C. Montague Cooke: Some new species of Amastra. Bishop Museum Occasional Papers 3(3): 1-34. 1917

*********************


Depiction from: ‘ C. Montague Cooke: Some new species of Amastra. Bishop Museum Occasional Papers 3(3): 1-34. 1917’

(not in copyright)

*********************

edited: 03.10.2020

Leptachatina pulchra Cooke

Beautiful Leptachatina Snail (Leptachatina pulchra)

The Beautiful Leptachatina Snail was described in 1911; it was inhabiting the slopes of the Wai’anae Mountains on the island of O’ahu, Hawaiian Islands where it was found in open country at the base of small ferns.

The shells reach heights of about 0.83 cm; they are somewhat glossy, the spire and the upper part of the last whorl are light brown, the base is darker brown with a dark brown band accompanying the sutures.

*********************

Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911’  

(public domain)  

*********************  

References:  

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911  

*********************

edited: 22.01.2024

Leptachatina anceyana Cooke

Ancey’s Leptachatina Snail (Leptachatina anceyana)

This species was endemic to the island of Hawai’i, Hawaiian Islands.

The shells reach heights of about 0.5 cm; since they are only known based on subfossil remains, the original color is not known.

A small species unlike anything from Hawaii. … The surface is minutely and very closely striate with lines of growth. This species is rather abundant in the fossil deposits explored by Dr. Henshaw in Mana.

*********************

Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911’   

(public domain)

*********************   

References:   

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911

*********************

edited: 14.01.2024

Leptachatina vana Sykes

Hunting Leptachatina Snail (Leptachatina vana)

This species was described in 1900; it is known from the slopes of Mt. Ka’ala, the highest mountain of the island of O’ahu, Hawaiian Islands.

The shells reach heights of about 0.78 cm; According to the species’ author it is “a brownish horny, pyramidal shell which has no striking characters.“.

*********************

Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911’  

(public domain)  

*********************  

References:  

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911  

*********************

edited: 22.01.2024

Amastra malleata Smith

Hammered Amastra Snail (Amastra malleata)

The Hammered Amastra Snail was described 1873; it was found in the forests around Kula in the northern part of eastern Maui, Hawaiian Islands.

The shells reached sizes of about 1,4 cm in height.

*********************

References:

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a. o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911

*********************

Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a. o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911’

(public domain)

*********************

edited: 16.05.2022

Newcombia gagei Severns

Gage’s Newcombia Snail (Newcombia gagei

This species was described in 2009, it was described based on subfossil shells that were collected from the Waipoli Dune fossil deposit on the island of Kaua’i, Hawaiian Islands. The age of these deposit is not known but is most likely Late Pleistocene/Early Holocene.

The shells of this species reached sizes of 2,49 cm, making it one of the largest species in its genus. [1]

*********************

References:

[1] Mike Severns: A new species of newcombia from the Pleistocene of Kaua’i, Hawaiian Islands, USA (Gastropoda, Pulmonata, Achatinellidae). Basteria 73: 57-60. 2009

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edited: 16.06.2020

Leptachatina captiosa Cooke

Captious Leptachatina Snail (Leptachatina captiosa)

This species was described in 1911; it inhabited the Wai’anae Mountains on the island of O’ahu, Hawaiian Islands.

The shells reach sizes of about 1 cm; they are minutely perforate, ovate, corneous, nearly solid, scarcely glossy, faintly and closely striated with growth lines; the aperture is rather large, subovate, very slightly oblique and nearly perpendicular; the columella is nearly straight, arcuate below and bears an acute callus along its face; the outer lip is slightly arcuate and distinctly thickened; the umbilicus is very minute. [1]

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Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911’  

(public domain)  

*********************  

References:  

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911  

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edited: 22.01.2024

Leptachatina teres (Pfeiffer)

Terete Leptachatina Snail (Leptachatina teres)

This species was described in 1855; it is thought to have been endemic to the island of O’ahu, Hawaiian Islands.

The Terete Leptachatina Snail appears to be very closely related to the Obtuse Leptachatina Snail (Leptachatina obtusa (Pfeiffer)) and both may even be conspecific. [1]

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References:   

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911

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edited: 15.01.2024

Leptachatina opipara Cooke

Opipara Leptachatina Snail (Leptachatina opipara)

The Opipara Leptachatina Snail was described in 1911; it was restricted to a small area in the mountainous area behind the Palolo Valley in south-eastern O’ahu, Hawaiian Islands.

The shells reach heights of about 0.94 cm; they are thin, glossy and corneous colored.

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Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911’  

(public domain)  

*********************  

References:  

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911  

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edited: 22.01.2024

Planamastra spaldingi ssp. spaldingi Cooke

Spalding’s Planamastra Snail (Planamastra spaldingi ssp. spaldingi

This species was described in 1933, it is restricted to Pukaloa in the Wai’anae Mountains of O’ahu, Hawaiian Islands.

Planamastra spaldingi should be considered a very rare species. In the Museum collection are eight lots; five are from the small valley of Pukaloa. In only one of the lots are there more than two specimens, and not more than 25 to 30 shells have come to my notice.

***

This species should not be mistaken for Spalding’s Amastra Snail (Amastra spaldingi Cooke).

*********************

References:

[1] C. Montague Cooke: New species of Amastridae. Bishop Museum Occasional Papers 10(6): 1-29. 1933

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edited: 27.09.2020

Newcombia philippiana (Pfeiffer)

Philippiana Newcombia Snail (Newcombia philippiana) 

The Philippiana Newcombia Snail was described in 1857, the species is known only from the type series which was collected on one of the Hawaiian Islands (most likely Moloka’i), its taxonomic status, however, is not fully understood.

The species is considered extinct. [1]

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References:

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 22: Achatinellidae. 1912-1914

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edited: 16.06.2020

Amastra pagodula Cooke

Pagoda-shaped Amastra Snail (Amastra pagodula)

The Pagoda-shaped Amastra Snail was described in 1917; it is known only from (sub)fossil remains that were recovered from late Pleistocene/early Holocene deposits at Pu’u Wa’awa’a, an ancient cinder cone in Kona on the island of Hawai’i.

The shells reached average sizes of 0,8 to about 1 cm in height.

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References:

[1] C. Montague Cooke: Some new species of Amastra. Bishop Museum Occasional Papers 3(3): 1-34. 1917

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Photo from: ‘C. Montague Cooke: Some new species of Amastra. Bishop Museum Occasional Papers 3(3): 1-34. 1917’

(public domain)

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edited: 04.05.2022

Amastra fragilis Pilsbry & Cooke

Fragile Amastra Snail (Amastra fragilis)

The Fragile Amastra Snail was found in the vicinity of a freshwater spring near a pipeline trail in Kaunakaki, a place at the southern coast of the Hawaiian island of Moloka’i, as well as some other places further east.

The shells reached sizes of about 0,9 cm in height, they were:

“… thin, fragile, perforate, narrowly ovate-conic, chestnut brown, scarcely shining, very finely, irregularely striate and with larger striae at irregular intervals; commonly dubed with faecal matter and soil.” [1]

*********************

References:

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol. 23: Appendix to Amastridae. Tornatellinidae. Index, vols. XXI-XXIII. 1915-1916

*********************

Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol. 23: Appendix to Amastridae. Tornatellinidae. Index, vols. XXI-XXIII. 1915-1916’

(public domain)

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edited: 15.06.2020

Amastra grayana (Pfeiffer)

Gray’s Amastra Snail (Amastra grayana)

Gray’s Amastra Snail was described in 1855, it was endemic to the Lana’ihale, the highest point on the island of Lana’i in the Hawaiian Islands, were it was found on the ground of the native forests.

This was a rather large species, its shells reached sizes of up to 2,1 cm in heigth.

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References:

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911

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Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911′    

(public domain)

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edited: 15.06.2020

Amastra tenuilabris Gulick

Pauoa Amastra Snail (Amastra tenuilabris)

The Pauoa Amastra Snail was described in 1873, it comes from the Nu’uanu Valley and the small adjecent Pauoa Valley in the vicinity of the Pu’u Konahuanui in the eastern part of O’ahu, Hawaiian Islands.

… from the original description.:

Shell dextral, ovate-conic, hardly shining, somewhat roughly striated with growth-lines; white under a fulvous epidermis, which is generally worn off below the suture on the last whorl. Whorls 5 1/2, a little convex. Aperture subquadrate, white, not as long as the spire; peristome thin; columella straight, provided with a small median fold; lips connected by a very thin callus. length 15, diam. 8 mm.” [1]

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References:

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911

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Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911′ 

(public domain)

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edited: 05.10.2020

Amastra porcus Hyatt & Pilsbry

Piglet Amastra Snail (Amastra porcus)

The Piglet Amastra Snail was described in 1911, it was apparently restricted to the Mokuleia Valley in the northernmost part of the Wai’anae Mountains on the island of O’ahu, Hawaiian Islands.

… from the original description.:

A this shell of unusually swollen shape. In contour it is not unlike some of the small, subglobose individuals of A. tristis, such as occur in Moanalua, but it differs by lacking a dark deciduous outer layer of cuticle and in the sculpture of the embryonic whorls, so that the relationship cannot be thought close. its relationships are not clear to us. No other described oahu shell resembles it.” 

*********************

References:

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911

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Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911′

(public domain)

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edited: 07.10.2020

Newcombia sulcata (Pfeifer)

Furrowed Newcombia Snail (Newcombia sulcata

The Furrowed Newcombia Snail was described in 1857, like most of its congeners, it was endemic to the island of Moloka’i, Hawaiian Islands.

The shells reached sizes of 1,1 cm in heigth.

***

This species can be confused with no other. the whorls are regularely, obsoletely, transversely striate, increasing in strength to the last whorls and disappear on the lower half of the last whorl. the color is red-brown, becoming more intense with the increase of the whorls, and on the last whorl it is quite shining dark red-brown.” [1]

*********************

References:

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 22: Achatinellidae. 1912-1914

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Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 22: Achatinellidae. 1912-1914′  

(public domain)

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edited: 16.06.2020

Leptachatina laevigata Cooke

Polished Leptachatina Snail (Leptachatina laevigata)

The Polished Leptachatina Snail, described in 1911, was restricted to the Mapulehu Ridge on the island of Moloka’i, Hawaiian Islands.

The shells reached heights of about 0.76 cm; the spires were either reddish brown above and yellowish corneous below or unicolored brownish corneous.

This species is now extinct like most of its congeners.

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Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911’   

(public domain)

*********************   

References:   

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911

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edited: 14.01.2024

Amastra decorticata Gulick

Debarked Amastra Snail (Amastra decorticata)

This species was endemic to the western parts of the island of O’ahu in the Hawaiian Islands, where it could be found in the forests under dead leaves.

The shells reached sizes of 1,5 to 1,64 cm in heigth.

*********************

References:

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911

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Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911′    

(public domain)

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edited: 15.06.2020

Amastra mucronata ssp. mucronata (Newcomb)

Sharp-pointed Amastra Snail (Amastra mucronata ssp. mucronata)

The Sharp-pointed Amastra Snail was described in 1853, it inhabited the Halawa-, the Mapulehu-, and the Moakea Valley in the eastern part of Moloka’i, Hawaiian Islands.

The shells reach sizes of 1,7 cm in lenght and about 0,9 cm in diameter. [1]

*********************

References:

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911

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Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911′

(public domain)

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edited: 07.10.2020

Amastra modicella Cooke

Small-sized Amastra Snail (Amastra modicella)

This species was described in 1917; it was found at elevations of 1828 m north-western Hawai’i, Hawaiian Islands.

The shells of this species reached average sizes of about 0,96 cm length.

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References:

[1] C. Montague Cooke: Some new species of Amastra. Bishop Museum Occasional Papers 3(3): 1-34. 1917

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Photo from: ‘C. Montague Cooke: Some new species of Amastra. Bishop Museum Occasional Papers 3(3): 1-34. 1917’

(public domain)

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edited: 04.05.2022

Amastra aurostoma Baldwin

Golden-mouthed Amastra Snail (Amastra aurostoma)

The Golden-mouthed Amastra Snail was found at a place named Ka’alele Pa’aka, which is located along the main ridge of the Lana’ihale, the highest point on the island of Lana’i, Hawaiian Islands. [2]

The species was described alive.:

Animal when extended in motion as long as the shell; mantle dark slate, margined on the outer side with reddish-brown. Foot above and below very dark brown, the sides studded with large patches of darker hue, the posterior portion tinged with red. the head above and tentacles covered with almost black granulations.” [1]

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References:

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911
[2] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol. 23: Appendix to Amastridae. Tornatellinidae. Index, vols. XXI-XXIII. 1915-1916

*********************

Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol. 23: Appendix to Amastridae. Tornatellinidae. Index, vols. XXI-XXIII. 1915-1916’

(public domain)

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edited: 15.06.2020

Carelia pilsbryi ssp. pilsbryi Sykes

Pilsbry’s Carelia Snail (Carelia pilsbryi ssp. pilsbryi 

Pilsbry’s Carelia Snail was described in 1909 based on subfossil specimens.  

E. R. Sykes, the author of this species already mentioned:  

I have only seen a single specimen of C. Pilsbryi, and the species is, I should think, an extinct one, like some others of the group.” [1]  

***

The species formerly inhabited a small area from the Kalihiwai stream to a streamlet near the eastern beach of Kalihikai at the northern shore of Kaua’i, Hawaiian Islands.  

The shells reached lengths of averagely up to 6,5 cm, some up to 8 cm.  

***

Pilsby’s Carelia Snail apparently inhabited lowland regions, and thus was one of the first species that felt victim to the Polynesian Rats (Rattus exulans (Peale)), which had been introduced by the Polynesian settlers.  

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References:  

[1] E. R. Sykes: Carelia pilsbry, n. sp., from the Hawaiian Islands. Proceedings of the Malacological Society of London 8: 204 1908-1909 
[2] C. Montague Cooke Jr.: The land snail genus Carelia. Bishop Museum Bulletin 85: 1-97. 1931  

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Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911′

(public domain) 

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edited: 01.04.2018

Leptachatina molokaiensis Cooke

Molokai Leptachatina Snail (Leptachatina molokaiensis)

The Molokai Leptachatina Snail was described in 1911; it was found, amongst other places, near the village of Kalua’aha in eastern Moloka’i, Hawaiian Islands.

The shells are about 0.73 cm heigh, glossy light brownish corneous colored and minutely striated with growth lines.

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Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911’   

(public domain)

*********************   

References:   

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911

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edited: 15.01.2024

Laminella depicta (Baldwin)

Depicted Laminella Snail (Laminella depicta)

The Depicted Laminella Snail is, or rather was, endemic to the island of Moloka’i, Hawaiian Islands, where it inhabited the lowland forests in the Pelekunu Valley and the Ha’upu Bay.

The shells reached sizes of 1,5 to 1,7 cm in heigth.

***

The Depicted Laminella Snail was also treated as a subspecies of Alexander’s Amastra Snail (Laminella alexandri (Newcomb)), which, however, occurs on the island of Maui.

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Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911’  

(public domain)

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edited: 12.06.2020

Amastra perversa Hyatt & Pilsbry

Wicked Amastra Snail (Amastra perversa)

The Wicked Amastra Snail was described in 1911, apparently on the basis of a single (sub)fossil specimen that was obtained from the Halawa Valley near the eastern end of Moloka’i, Hawaiian Islands.

The species appears to be very closely related to the Awkward Amastra Snail (Amastra laeva Baldwin) from eastern Maui and differs from that species only in being smoother and in having whorls of a slightly smaller caliber and a smaller aperture. [1]

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References:

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911

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Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911′

(public domain)

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edited: 07.10.2020

Leptachatina baldwini Cooke

Baldwin’s Leptachatina Snail (Leptachatina baldwini)

Baldwin’s Leptachatina Snail was described in 1911; it was endemic to the island of Maui, Hawaiian Islands.

The shells reach heights of 0.63 cm; they are “minutely perforate, elongately turrited, corneous, thin, subdiaphanous, minutely striate, especially below the suture.

This species is believed to be extinct now.

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Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911’   

(public domain)

*********************   

References:   

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911

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edited: 15.01.2024

Pauahia chrysallis (Pfeiffer)

Golden Pauahia Snail (Pauahia chrysallis)

The Golden Pauahia Snail was described in 1855, it is, or rather was, endemic to the island of O’ahu, Hawaiian Islands, where at least three populations are known from Wahiawa, Waialua, and the Wai’anae Mountains

The shells reached sizes of size 0,9 cm in heigth. [1]

*********************

References:

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911

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Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911′  

(public domain)

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edited: 16.06.2020

Amastra flavescens (Newcomb)

Yellowish Amastra Snail (Amastra flavescens)

The Yellowish Amastra Snail is, or rather was, endemic to the island of Hawai’, Hawaiian Islands, it is believed to have been quite widespread with several populations occurring in nearly all forested areas of the island. [1]

The shells reached sizes of about 1,5 to 1,6 cm in heigth.

*********************

References:

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol. 23: Appendix to Amastridae. Tornatellinidae. Index, vols. XXI-XXIII. 1915-1916

*********************

Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol. 23: Appendix to Amastridae. Tornatellinidae. Index, vols. XXI-XXIII. 1915-1916’

(public domain)

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edited: 15.06.2020

Amastra viriosa Cooke

Robust Amastra Snail (Amastra viriosa)

The Robust Amastra Snail was described in 1917; it was found in the forests on the mountain slopes along the western coast of Hawai’i Island.

A. viriosa is unlike any species so far reported from Hawaii. Its nearest relative is probably the extinct A. senilis from Waimea. The latter is a larger species, much more roughly sculptured and has a larger perforation, besides being much broader in proportion to its length.” [1]

The shells reached average sizes of about 2 cm in height.

The species was found alive but was apparently already on the brink of extinction at that time.

*********************

References:

[1] C. Montague Cooke: Some new species of Amastra. Bishop Museum Occasional Papers 3(3): 1-34. 1917

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Photo from: ‘C. Montague Cooke: Some new species of Amastra. Bishop Museum Occasional Papers 3(3): 1-34. 1917’

(public domain)

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edited: 04.05.2022

Amastra caputadamantis Hyatt & Pilsbry

Leahi Amastra Snail (Amastra caputadamantis)

This species is known from a Late Pleistocene/Early Holocene deposit at the Le’ahi (Diamond Head) at the southern coast of O’ahu, Hawaiian Islands.

The shells reached sizes of 1,38 to 1,45 cm in heigth. [1]

*********************

References:

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911

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Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911′    

(public domain)

*********************

edited: 15.06.2020

Amastra violacea (Newcomb)

Violet Amastra Snail (Amastra violacea)

The Violet Amastra Snail was described in 1853, it was found in the Halawa-, the Mapulehu-, and the Pelekunu Valleys in the eastern part of Moloka’i, Hawaiian Islands.

It was one of the larger species of its genus, some shells reach sizes of 2,8 to 3 cm in lenght and 1,3 to 1,5 cm in diameter.

… from the original description.:

Shell dextral, ovate-oblong, solid; whorls 7, convex, strongly striate longitudinally; suture plain and deeply impressed. Aperture ovate; columella short, terminating in a twisted plait; lip simple, color violaceous with light colored striae.” [1]

*********************    

References:

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911

*********************

Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911′ 

(public domain) 

*********************

edited: 07.10.2020

Leptachatina brevicula Pease

Shortish Leptachtina Snail (Leptachatina brevicula 

The Shortish Leptachtina Snail was described in 1869, the species is known from a place named Kaholuamano at an elevation of about 1219 m on the island of Kaua’i, Hawaiian Islands.  

The shells reached heights of about 0,8 cm. [1]  

*********************  

References:  

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911  

*********************    

Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911’  

(public domain)  

*********************  

edited: 31.03.2018

Amastra morticina Hyatt & Pilsbry

Dead Amastra Snail (Amastra morticina 

This species was described in 1911, apparently based on subfossil specimens that had been collected from sandy deposits at the Kahului Bay at the northern coast of Maui, Hawaiian Islands.  

The species was already extinct at that date, it very likely disappeared shortly after the occupation of the island by the first Hawaiian settlers.  

***

The shells reach sizes of about 1 to 1,5 cm, those of the type specimens are dull reddish colored while others are whitish colored (see picture)  

*********************

Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911′  

(public domain)  

********************* 

edited: 22.03.2018

Laminella kuhnsi (Cooke)

Kuhns’ Laminella Snail (Laminella kuhnsi)

Kuhns’ Laminella Snail was described in 1908, it was originally identified as another species, Amastra erecta (Pease), but was subsequently recognized as being a distinct species (and genus).

The species was found in the vicinity of the Kahakuloa Bay at the northern north-east of western Maui, Hawaiian Islands.

The shells reached sizes of about 1,34 cm in length, they were completely brown and had some zigzag markings in their epidermis, there appears to have also been a straw-colored variety. [1]

*********************

References:

[1] C. Montague Cooke Jr.: Amastra (Laminella) kuhnsi. Bishop Museum Occasional Papers 3(2): 217-218. 1908

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Depiction from: ‘C. Montague Cooke Jr.: Amastra (Laminella) kuhnsi. Bishop Museum Occasional Papers 3(2): 217-218. 1908’

(public domain)

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edited: 12.06.2020

Carelia dolei ssp. isenbergi Cooke

Isenberg’s Carelia Snail (Carelia dolei ssp. isenbergi)

This taxon, described in 1931, inhabited the so-called Ha’ena plain, a lowland region in north-western Kaua’i, Hawaiian Islands; it occupies a kind of intermediate position between Cuming’s Carelia Snail (Carelia cumingiana (Pfeiffer)) and the nominate form of Dole’s Carelia Snail and may in fact well be a hybrid form.

*********************  

References:  

[1] C. Montague Cooke Jr.: The land snail genus Carelia. Bishop Museum Bulletin 85: 1-97. 1931

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edited: 25.01.2024

Leptachatina deceptor Cockerell

Deceiving Leptachatina Snail (Leptachatina deceptor)  

The Deceiving Leptachatina Snail was described in 1927.  

The species is known from subfossil specimens that were recovered from the sandy deposits at Ha’ena on the north coast of Kaua’i, Hawaiian Islands. [1]  

*********************  

References:  

[1] Theodore D. A. Cockerell: Two species of Leptachatina from the island of Kauai. Journal of Conchology 18(4): 117. 1927  

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edited: 31.03.2018

Amastra conica Baldwin

Conical Amastra Snail (Amastra conica)

The Conical Amastra Snail was described 1906, it was endemic to the Hamakua Distict in the northern part of Hawai’i, Hawaiian Islands.

***

Shell fossil, dextral, minutely perforated, thin, elongately conical, apex acute; surface sculptured with fine growth-lines, apical whorls raidiately sulcated. Color of living shell unknown.” [1]

This species apparently disappeared already at the beginning of the Holocene era.

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References:

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911

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Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911′    

(public domain)

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edited: 15.06.2020

Carelia hyattiana Pilsbry

Hyatt’s Carelia Snail (Carelia hyattiana)

This form is apparently known from only 11 specimens that all seem to be in a subfossil stage.

This species is based upon a fossil shell which was associated with C. dolei in the collection, and which evidently came from the same formation. It differs from C. dolei in wanting an angle or carina at the shoulder at all stages of growth. On the last whorl there is an obtuse but quite appreciable basal angle, which, with its shorter aperture, serves to differentiate this species from C. pilsbry Sykes.” [1]

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Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911’  

(public domain)  

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References:  

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911
[2] C. Montague Cooke Jr.: The land snail genus Carelia. Bishop Museum Bulletin 85: 1-97. 1931

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edited: 25.01.2024

Leptachatina irregularis (Pfeiffer)

Irregular Leptachatina Snail (Leptachatina irregularis 

The Irregular Leptachatina Snail was described in 1855. [or 1856, according to which source]  

This species, if it is accepted as one, is apparently only known from one collection [or even from only one specimen?], that was collected somewhere on the “Sandwich Islands”, the exact origin is not known.  

***

The The Irregular Leptachatina Snail, however, has not been accepted by all authors, and if it has been, it was sometimes placed into the genus Amastra, it is now thought to most certainly be identical with Leptachatina fusca Newcomb. [1]  

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References:  

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911  

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edited: 31.03.2018

Carelia paradoxa ssp. paradoxa (Pfeiffer)

Paradox Carelia Snail (Carelia paradoxa ssp. paradoxa 

The nominate of this species was described based on fresh, empty shells and subfossil ones, all other races are known from subfossil specimens alone.  

The shells reached lengths of up to 4,5 cm, they are distinctly and closely granulate, blackish brown, the spire is long and forms an acute cone above.  

The species inhabited the near-shore lowlands at the base of the Kalepa Mountains on the southern side of the Wailua river, where it met with a relict population of the Dead Carelia Snail (Carelia necra Newcomb) and formed a hybrid population that was originally described as a distinct subspecies (Carelia paradoxa ssp. thaanumi Cooke).  

This hybrid form was characterized by its embryonic whorl that was similar to that of C. paradoxa, while its adult whorls where identical to those of C. necra. [2]  

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References:  

[1] C. Montague Cooke Jr.: The land snail genus Carelia. Bishop Museum Bulletin 85: 1-97. 1931 [2] Elwood Zimmerman: Insects of Hawaii 1, Introduction. University of Hawaii Press, Honolulu 1947  

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Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911′

(public domain) 

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edited: 01.04.2018

Leptachatina simplex Pease

Simple Leptachatina Snail (Leptachatina simplex 

The Simple Leptachatina Snail was described in 1869, it was endemic to the island of Hawai’i, Hawaiian Islands, where it was found in the Kona district and in the Waimea region at elevations of 915 to about 1220 m.  

The shells reached a height of only about 0,8 cm.    

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Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911’  

(public domain)

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edited: 31.03.2018

Carelia sinclairi Ancey

Sinclair’s Carelia Snail (Carelia sinclairi)  

Sinclair’s Carelia Snail was described in 1892 based on several subfossil specimens.  

The species is the only member of its genus known so far to have occurred on the island of Ni’ihau, Hawaiian Islands.  

The shells are very common in the fossil deposits of the island, and about 1000 specimens alone are kept in the collections of the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum in Honolulu, O’ahu. [1]  

***

Sinclair’s Carelia Snail is quite different from its congeners and, in my opinion, should be placed in a distinct genus.  

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References:  

[1] C. Montague Cooke Jr.: The land snail genus Carelia. Bishop Museum Bulletin 85: 1-97. 1931  

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Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911′

(public domain) 

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edited: 01.04.2018

Leptachatina tenebrosa Pease

Dark Leptachatina Snail (Leptachatina tenebrosa 

The Dark Leptachatina Snail, described in 1869, was endemic to the island of Kaua’I, where it was found at several localities in the Waimea Canyon area, for example Halemanu, Kaholuamano, and Pu’u Ka Pele.  

The shells of this species reached an average height of about 1,2 cm.  

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Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911’ 

(public domain) 

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edited: 31.03.2018

Leptachatina antiqua Pease

Antique Leptachatina Snail (Leptachatina antiqua)  

The Antique Leptachatina Snail was described in 1870, it was already extinct at that date as the author mentions in the description.:  

The shell is subfossil, oblong subcylindrical, solid scarcely rimate, longitudinally faintly striate; whorls 7, flatly convex, narrowly margined at the suture; spire somewhat obtuse; aperture oblong oval; columella obliquely truncate; columellar fold obsolete. Length 9.0, diam. 3,5 mm.” [1]  

***

The species was apparently a inhabitant of lowland areas and thus disappeared directly after the arrival of the first Polynesian settlers.  

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References:  

[1] W. Harper Pease: Observations sur les espèces de Coquilles terrestres qui habitent l’île de Kauai (îles Hawaii), accompagnées de descriptions d’espèces nouvelles. Journal de conchyliologie. 3e série. tome Xe. Vol. 18: 87-97. 1970  

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Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911’  

(public domain) 

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edited: 31.03.2018

Leptachatina mcgregori Pilsbry & Cooke

Mcgregor’s Leptachatina Snail (Leptachatina mcgregori)  

This species was described in 1914, it inhabited an area around the town of Lahaina at the west coast of Maui, Hawaiian Islands.  

The shells reached lengths of about 0,63 cm. [1]  

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References:  

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 23: Appendix to Amastridae. Tornatellinidae. Index, vols. XXI-XXIII 1915-1916  

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Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 23: Appendix to Amastridae. Tornatellinidae. Index, vols. XXI-XXIII 1915-1916‘ 

(public domain)  

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edited: 31.03.2018

Amastra crassilabrum (Newcomb)

Thick-lipped Amastra Snail (Amastra crassilabrum)

The Thick-lipped Amastra Snail is known from the dense rainforests near Mt. Ka’ala, the highest mountain on the island of O’ahu, Hawaiian Islands.

The shells reached sizes of about 1,5 cm in heigth.

***

A very distinct, easily recognized species. The brown color of the spire often extends over the front of the last whorl. There is generally a light line just above the suture on the penult. whorl. Many specimens from two localities, including specimens from Newcomb, show but little variation.” [1]

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References:

[1] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911

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Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911′    

(public domain)

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edited: 15.06.2020

Leptachatina tenuicostata Pease

Thin-ribbed Leptachatina Snail (Leptachatina tenuicostata 

The Thin-ribbed Leptachatina Snail was described in 1869, the species is apparently known exclusively from [sub]fossil shells that had been recovered from a deposit on the island of Hawai’i, Hawaiian Islands.  

The shells reached an average height of about 0,8 cm  

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Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911’ 

(public domain) 

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edited: 31.03.2018

Amastra antiqua Baldwin

Antique Amastra Snail (Amastra antiqua) 

The Antique Amastra Snail  was described in 1895, it is known only from subfossil shells.

We received this species from Prof. A. B. Lyons, of Oahu College. He reports that he found at Ewa a singular accumulation of these and other fossil land shells, huddled together in one spot in a bed of soft tufa-like material, at an altitude not far above sea-level. The existence of living examples of this and the following species now, or within any recent period, is highly improbable.” [1][2]

The shells are about 2 cm heigh.

The Antique Amastra Snail very likely was a Pleistocene species that disappeared at the beginning of the Holocene era when the sea levels were rising.

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References:

[1] D. D. Baldwin: Descriptions of new species of Achatinellidae from the Hawaiian Islands. Proceedings of the academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia 47: 214-236. 1895
[2] George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911

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Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second series: Pulmonata. Vol 21: Achatinellidae (Amastrinae). 1911′  

(public domain)

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edited: 27.09.2020