Tag Archives: Leiocephalidae

Leiocephalus sp. ‘Jamaica’

Second Jamaican Curly-tailed Lizard (Leiocephalus sp.)

This somewhat enigmatic form is known from at least one subfossil frontal bone that differed from the other frontal bones by its well-developed rugosities while being of comparable size to other frontal bones from other deposits.

These frontal bones are not really assignable to either the named species (Leiocephalus jamaicensis Etheridge) or to the second, unnamed one because they were found unassociated to other remains. [1]

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References:

[1] Gregory K. Pregill: Systematics of the West Indian Lizard Genus Leiocephalus (Squamata: Iguania: Tropiduridae). Miscellaneous Publications of the Museum of Natural History, University of Kansas 84: 1-69. 1992

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edited: 07.09.2019

Leiocephalus jamaicensis Etheridge

Jamaican Curly-tailed Lizard (Leiocephalus jamaicensis)

The Jamaican Curly-tailed Lizard was described in 1966 based on fossil or subfossil left dentary that had been recovered from Dairy Cave 2,5 kilometers away from Dry Harbour in the parish of St. Ann, Jamaica, as well as several other remains from other caves on the island.

In life, the species might have reached a size of about 26 to 30 cm or even larger (including the tail). [1][2]

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The species survived into historical times, some of the remains that have been found were unmineralized and had been collected from surface deposits. [2]

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References:

[1] Richard Etheridge: An extinct lizard of the genus Leiocephalus from Jamaica. Quarterly Journal of the Florida Academy of Sciences 29(1): 47-59. 1966
[2] Gregory K. Pregill: Systematics of the West Indian Lizard Genus Leiocephalus (Squamata: Iguania: Tropiduridae). Miscellaneous Publications of the Museum of Natural History, University of Kansas 84: 1-69. 1992

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edited: 07.09.2019

Leiocephalus cuneus ssp. ‘Antigua’

Antigua Curly-tailed Lizard (Leiocephalus cuneus ssp. 

The Antigua Curly-tailed Lizard is known only from subfossil remains, which are assigned to the Barbuda Curly-tailed Lizard (Leiocephalus cuneus Etheridge).  

I’d like to refer to this form from the island of Antigua, Antigua and Barbuda, as a subspecies distinct from its Barbudan congener, since both islands, Antigua and Barbuda, are disconnected since the end of the Pleistocene era about 10000 years ago.  

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References:  

[1] Gregory K. Pregill: Systematics of the West Indian Lizard Genus Leiocephalus (Squamata: Iguania: Tropiduridae). Miscellaneous Publications of the Museum of Natural History, University of Kansas 84: 1-69. 1992

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edited: 08.09.2019

Leiocephalus sp. ‘ Guadeloupe’

Guadeloupe Curly-tailed Lizard (Leiocephalus sp.)

This undescribed form, which may or may not be related to or even conspecific with the Barbuda Curly-tailed Lizard (Leiocephalus cuneus Etheridge) is known from subfossil remains of Latest Holocene age found in 1984 in an unnamed cave at Pointe du Capucin at the northern shore of the island of Basse Terre in the Guadeloupe archipelago.

The Guadeloupe Curly-tailed Lizard survived into historical times, the remains have not yet been dated but were found associated with the bones of rats, which were introduced to the Caribbean only in the 15th century. [1]

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References:

[1] Gregory K. Pregill: Systematics of the West Indian Lizard Genus Leiocephalus (Squamata: Iguania: Tropiduridae). Miscellaneous Publications of the Museum of Natural History, University of Kansas 84: 1-69. 1992

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edited: 08.09.2019

Leiocephalus partidus Pregill

Puerto Rico Curly-tailed Lizard (Leiocephalus partidus)

The Puerto Rico Curly-tailed Lizard was described in 1981, as far as I know it is known only from two subfossil remains that had been recovered from the Guánica Bat Cave in the Reserva Forestal Guánica in the Minicipio de Guayanilla, and from the Cueva del Perro in the Municipio de Morovis, Puerto Rico.

The species reached a large size which has been estimated as having been around 30 cm (including the tail).

The radiocarbon age of these remains is not available yet but they are most likely of Late Pleistocene to Early Holocene in age. [1]

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References:

[1] Gregory K. Pregill: Systematics of the West Indian Lizard Genus Leiocephalus (Squamata: Iguania: Tropiduridae). Miscellaneous Publications of the Museum of Natural History, University of Kansas 84: 1-69. 1992

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edited: 07.09.2019

Leiocephalus eremitus Cope

Navassa Curly-tailed Lizard (Leiocephalus eremitus)  

The Navassa Curly-tailed Lizard was described in 1868, it is known only from the type specimen, a female bearing three mature ova [eggs].  

The species was endemic to the tiny, uninhabited yet not undisputed island of Navassa: the island is the subject of an ongoing territorial dispute between Haiti and the United States, both of which claim the ownership over the little dry rock.  

The Navassa Curly-tailed Lizard reached a size of about 13 to 14 cm long (including the tail). [1]  

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References:  

[1] Gregory K. Pregill: Systematics of the West Indian Lizard Genus Leiocephalus (Squamata: Iguania: Tropiduridae). Miscellaneous Publications of the Museum of Natural History, University of Kansas 84: 1-69. 1992  

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edited: 07.09.2019

Leiocephalus endomychus Schwartz

Central Haitian Curly-tailed Lizard (Leiocephalus endomychus)  

The Central Haitian Curly-tailed Lizard was described in 1967, originally as a subspecies of Cochran’s Curly-tailed Lizard (Leiocephalus vinculum Cochran) but was revalued to species status in 1992. [1][2]  

The species was apparently restricted to the Plateau Central in the Haitian part of the island of Hispaniola, Greater Antilles.  

The Central Haitian Curly-tailed Lizard was a smaller species, it reached a size of about 15 cm (including the tail). [1]  

The species was last recorded in 1976 and is now believed to be extinct.  

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References:  

[1] Albert Schwartz: The Leiocephalus (Lacertilia, Iguanidae) of Hispaniola, II. The Leiocephalus personatus complex. Tulane Studies in Zoology 14(1): 1-53. 1967 
[2] Gregory K. Pregill: Systematics of the West Indian Lizard Genus Leiocephalus (Squamata: Iguania: Tropiduridae). Miscellaneous Publications of the Museum of Natural History, University of Kansas 84: 1-69. 1992  

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throat of a male  

Depiction from: ‘ Albert Schwartz: The Leiocephalus (Lacertilia, Iguanidae) of Hispaniola, II. The Leiocephalus personatus complex. Tulane Studies in Zoology 14(1): 1-53. 1967’  

(under creative commons license (3.0)) 
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0

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edited: 08.09.2019

Leiocephalus cuneus Etheridge

Barbuda Curly-tailed Lizard (Leiocephalus cuneus)  

This species was described in 1964 based on subfossil bones that had been found one year prior on the island of Barbuda, Antigua and Barbuda.  

The species is said to have been the largest within its genus, it might in fact have reached sizes of over 40 cm (including the tail). [1][2]  

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The Barbuda Curly-tailed Lizard has survived at least until the 15th century, but died out shortly after the arrival of the first European settlers who also introduced rats to the islands, which again probably killed many of the endemic reptiles.  

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References:  

[1] David W. Steadman; Gregory K. Pregill; Storrs L. Olson: Fossil vertebrates from Antigua, Lesser Antilles: Evidence for late Holocene human-caused extinctions in the West Indies. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 81: 4448-4451. 1984 
[2] Gregory K. Pregill: Systematics of the West Indian Lizard Genus Leiocephalus (Squamata: Iguania: Tropiduridae). Miscellaneous Publications of the Museum of Natural History, University of Kansas 84: 1-69. 1992  

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edited: 08.09.2019

Leiocephalus apertosulcus Etheridge

Large Hispaniola Curly-tailed Lizard (Leiocephalus apertosulcus  

The Large Hispaniola Curly-tailed Lizard was described in 1965 based on subfossil remains that had been recovered from the deposits of a cave in the Cerro de San Francisco in the Municipio Pedro Santana of the Dominican Republic in the eastern part of Hispaniola Island.  

The species must have reached a size of about 40 cm (including the tail). [1][2]  

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The Large Hispaniola Curly-tailed Lizard was closely related to the St. Michel Curly-tailed Lizard (Leiocephalus anonymus Pregill), another species only known from subfossil remains found on the island of Hispaniola, but differed from that species by some of its anatomical features. [1]  

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References:  

[1] Gregory Pregill: An extinct species of Leiocephalus from Haiti (Sauria: Iguanidae). Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington 97(4): 827-833. 1984 
[2] Gregory K. Pregill: Systematics of the West Indian Lizard Genus Leiocephalus (Squamata: Iguania: Tropiduridae). Miscellaneous Publications of the Museum of Natural History, University of Kansas 84: 1-69. 1992  

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edited: 08.09.2019

Leiocephalus anonymous Pregill

St. Michel Curly-tailed Lizard (Leiocephalus anonymus)   

The St. Michel Curly-tailed Lizard was described in 1984 based on subfossil bones that had been collected already 50 years prior from the deposits of an unspecified cave (or from more than one cave, it is not known) near Saint-Michel-de-l’Attalaye in the Département Artibonite in the western part of Haiti.  

In life, the species must have reached a size of about 25 cm (including the tail). [1][2]  

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It is not known if this species survived into post-European times (after 1492), it is, however, quite likely. [1]  

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References:  

[1] Gregory Pregill: An extinct species of Leiocephalus from Haiti (Sauria: Iguanidae). Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington 97(4): 827-833. 1984 
[2] Gregory K. Pregill: Systematics of the West Indian Lizard Genus Leiocephalus (Squamata: Iguania: Tropiduridae). Miscellaneous Publications of the Museum of Natural History, University of Kansas 84: 1-69. 1992  

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right lower jaw  

Depiction from: ‘Gregory Pregill: An extinct species of Leiocephalus from Haiti (Sauria: Iguanidae). Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington 97(4): 827-833. 1984’  

(unter creative commons Lizenz (3.0)) 
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0

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edited: 08.09.2019