Tag Archives: Moorea

Staphylinidae gen. & sp. ‘Mo’orea’

Moorean Osoriine Rove Beetle (Staphylinidae gen. & sp.)

This species is known from at least a single head capsule that was recovered from deposits on the island of Mo’orea in the Society Islands; it can at least assigned to the subfamily Osoriinae. [1]

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References:

[1] Jennifer G. Kahn, Cordelia Nickelsen, Janelle Stevenson, Nick Porch, Emilie Dotte-Sarout, Carl C. Christensen, Lauren May, J. Stephen Athens, Patrick V. Kirch: Mid- to late Holocene landscape change and anthropogenic transformations on Mo‘orea, Society Islands: A multi-proxy approach. The Holocene 1-15. 2014

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edited: 31.10.2020

Curculionidae gen. & sp. ‘Mo’orea’

Moorean Cossonine Weevil(s) (Curculionidae gen. & sp.)

At least five genera/species assignable to the weevil subfamily Cossoninae are known from subfossil pronota found in deposits on the island of Mo’orea, Society Islands.

These remains belong to species of very different dimensions; the largest of them being almost nine times as large as the smallest.

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References:

[1] Jennifer G. Kahn, Cordelia Nickelsen, Janelle Stevenson, Nick Porch, Emilie Dotte-Sarout, Carl C. Christensen, Lauren May, J. Stephen Athens, Patrick V. Kirch: Mid- to late Holocene landscape change and anthropogenic transformations on Mo‘orea, Society Islands: A multi-proxy approach. The Holocene 1-15. 2014

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edited: 31.10.2020

Ampagia sp. ‘Moorea’

Moorean Ampagia Weevil (Ampagia sp.)

This species is apparently only known from a subfossil head capsule that was recovered from deposits on the island of Mo’orea in the Society Islands.

The species might have been mainly black in color. [1]

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References:  

[1] Jennifer G. Kahn, Cordelia Nickelsen, Janelle Stevenson, Nick Porch, Emilie Dotte-Sarout, Carl C. Christensen, Lauren May, J. Stephen Athens, Patrick V. Kirch: Mid- to late Holocene landscape change and anthropogenic transformations on Mo‘orea, Society Islands: A multi-proxy approach. The Holocene 1-15. 2014

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edited: 02.05.2021

Miocalles sp. ‘Mo’orea’

Black Moorea Miocalles Weevil (Miocalles sp.)

This species is known from a subfossil pronotum that was recovered from deposits on the island of Mo’orea in the Society Islands.

The species apparently was generally black in color. [1]

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References:

[1] Jennifer G. Kahn, Cordelia Nickelsen, Janelle Stevenson, Nick Porch, Emilie Dotte-Sarout, Carl C. Christensen, Lauren May, J. Stephen Athens, Patrick V. Kirch: Mid- to late Holocene landscape change and anthropogenic transformations on Mo‘orea, Society Islands: A multi-proxy approach. The Holocene 25(2): 1-15. 2014

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edited: 08.05.2022

Mautodontha parvidens (Pease)

Small-toothed Mautodontha Snail (Mautodontha parvidens)

The Small-toothed Mautodontha Snail was described in 1861; this species is known to occur on at least three islands, Huahine, Mo’orea, and Tahiti in the Society Islands.

The shells reach sizes of about 0,28 to 0,39 cm in diameter; they are light yellowish white with broad, protractively sinuate, reddish flammulations which become faint or absent on the base of the shell. [1]

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References:

[1] Alan Solem: Endodontoid land snails from Pacific Islands (Mollusca: Pulmonata: Sigmurethra). Part I, Family Endodontidae. Field Museum of Natural History Chicago, Illinois 1976

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Depiction from: ‘G. W. Tryon; H. A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second Series: Pulmonata Vol. 3, Helicidae Vol. 1. 1887’   

(public domain)

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edited: 13.03.2021

Mautodontha punctiperforata (Garrett)

Perforated Mautodontha Snail (Mautodontha punctiperforata)

This species was described in 1884; it is, or rather was, endemic to the island of Mo’orea in the Society archipelago.

The shells reach sizes of 0,3 to about 0,36 cm in diameter; they are light yellowish horn-colored with prominent, reddish flammulations which are broader above and are becoming narrower on the body whorl, fading out on the base of the shell. [2]

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References:

[1] Alan Solem: Endodontoid land snails from Pacific Islands (Mollusca: Pulmonata: Sigmurethra). Part I, Family Endodontidae. Field Museum of Natural History Chicago, Illinois 1976

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Depiction from: ‘G. W. Tryon; H. A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second Series: Pulmonata Vol. 3, Helicidae Vol. 1. 1887’   

(public domain)

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edited: 13.03.2021

Acrocephalus longirostris (Gmelin)

Moorea Reed-Warbler (Acrocephalus longirostris)  

The Tahiti Reed-Warbler (Acrocephalus caffer (Sparrman)) was described in 1786 as Sitta caffra, quasi as a nuthatch coming from southern Africa. This shows how much scientists in the 18th century understood of biogeography, biology, and taxonomy …!  

This species is now the sole member of its genus leftover in the Society Islands, but in former times there were at least four distinct forms inhabiting at least four of the islands in the archipelago. 

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According to DNA analyses made in 2008, it is now known that the four known reed warbler forms formerly found on the Society Islands are/were not conspecific but evolved from three separate colonization events.  

Thus, the Moorea Reed-Warbler, but also the Raiatea Reed-Warbler (Acrocephalus musae (J. R. Forster)), are now regarded as full species. [1]  

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The Moorea Reed-Warbler was described in 1789 (as a thrush, by the way).  

The species reached a size of about 19 cm and was superficially quite similar to the other Society Islands reed-warbler species but differed from them by its conspicuously pale outher tail feathers (unlike in the depiction below).  

The last approved record dates from 1981, however there appears to be a recent sighting made sometimes in 1998 or 1999 including a photo that, given the color of the tail feathers, almost certainly depicts this species. It is nevertheless now regarded as most likely extinct.

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References:  

[1] Alice Cibois; Jean-Claude Thibault; Eric Pasquet: Systematics of the extinct reed warblers Acrocephalus of the Society Islands of eastern Polynesia. Ibis 150: 365–376. 2008  

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Depiction: William Ellis; between 1776 and 1778

(public domain)

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edited: 21.01.2019

Hernandia drakeana Nadeaud

Drake’s Hernandia (Hernandia drakeana)

Drake’s Hernandia is known from the island of Mo’orea in the Society Islands; it was last recorded in 1981 and is considered extinct.

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This may, however, not really be a species but a naturally occurring hybrid between the other two Hernandia spp. that occur on the Society Islands, Hernandia moerenhoutiana Guill. and Hernandia ovigera L..

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edited: 02.05.2022

Partula aurantia Crampton

Golden Tree-Snail (Partula aurantia)  

This species was described in 1932.  

The species was endemic to the eastern part of Mo’orea, Society Islands, where it inhabited several valleys, including the Faamaariri valley, the Paraoro valley and the Vaipohe valley.  

The Golden Tree-Snail was an arboreal species and was often found on the leaves of the epiphytic fara pape (Freycinetia demissa Benn.). [1]  

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The species is now extinct, the reasons for its extinction are the same as for the other Polynesian tree-snail species.  

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References:  

[1] Justin Gerlach: Icons of Evolution: Pacific Island Tree-Snails of the Family Partulidae. Phelsuma Press 2016  

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edited: 18.10.2017