Tag Archives: Papua New Guinea

Cinnamomum englerianum Schewe

Engler’s Cinnamon (Cinnamomum englerianum)

This species is known from only two collections that were obtained at the early 1900s from a single locality along the Sepik river in Papua New Guinea.

The lowland areas in that region are now highly disturbed due to deforestation and this species might indeed be extinct now.

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The photo below shows an unspecified congeneric species (Cinnamomum sp.) that was photographed in Papua New Guinea.

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unspecified Cinnamon species (Cinnamomum sp.)

Photo: Kellie Uyeda
https://www.inaturalist.org/people/kuyeda
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

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edited: 24.02.2024

Columbidae gen. & sp. ‘Buka 2’

Kilu Ground Pigeon (Columbidae gen. & sp.)

This up to now undescribed species is known exclusively from subfossil remains that were recovered from Holocene deposits in the Kilu Cave on the island of Buka in the northernmost part of the Solomon Islands group.

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References:  

[1] David W. Steadman: Extinction and biogeography of Tropical Pacific Birds. University of Chicago Press 2006

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edited: 19.08.2022

Psittrichas sp. Admirality Islands

Admirylity Islands Parrot (Psittrichas sp.)

This species, if it indeed was one, is known exclusively from one account dating to about the middle of the 19th century.: 

I saw on the main island a scarlet and black Parrot or Cockatoo of some kind, which flew out of some high trees on the seashore, screaming loudly, like a Cockatoo. The bird was wary, and I could not get a shot at it. It reminded me at the time of the rare Dasyptilus pequetti [Pesquet’s Parrot (Psittrichas fulgidus (Lesson))] of New Guinea; it was of about that size.” [1][2]

This account may refer to a species endemic to the Admirality Islands, or it may refer to the actual Pesquet’s Parrot (see depiction below), which inhabites New Guinea itself and may once have had a wider distribution or may have traveld over sea from the larger island to the smaller offshore island groups.

If it indeed refers to a endemic form, this one is now extinct, since no such bird is known to occur on the Admirality Islands today.

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References:

[1] H. N. Moseley: Notes by a naturalist on the “Challenger”, being an account of various observations made during the voyage of H.M.S. “Challenger” around the world, in the years 1872-1876, under the commands of Capt. Sir G. S. Nares and Capt. F. T. Thomson. London, Macmillan and Co. 1879
[2] Julian P. Hume: Extinct Birds: 2nd edition 2017

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Pesquet’s Parrot (Psittrichas fulgidus)

Depiction from: R. P. Lesson: Illustrations de Zoologie, ou recueil de figures d’animaux, peintes d’après nature. Paris: Arthus Bertrand 1831-1835

(public domain)

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edited: 11.02.2020

Pampusana johannae ssp. admiralitatis (Rothschild & E. J. O. Hartert)

Admiralty Islands Bronze Ground Dove (Pampusana johannae ssp. admiralitatis)

The Admiralty Islands Bronze Ground Dove is a subspecies of the Eastern Ground Dove (Pampusana johannae (P. L. Sclater)) restricted to the Admiralty Islands north of eastern Papua New Guinea; it is sometimes assigned as a subspecies to the Western Bronze Ground Dove (Pampusana beccarii (Salvadori)) (see depiction).

This form is thought to be extinct.

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Solomon Bronze Ground-Dove (Pampusana johannae ssp. solomonensis (Ogilvie-Grant)); below, together with Western Bronze Ground Dove (Pampusana beccarii (Salvadori)); above 

Depiction from: Catalogue of the birds in the British Museum. London 21. 1893

(public domain)

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edited: 10.11.2020

Columbidae gen. & sp. ‘Buka 1’

Small-winged Ground Pigeon (Columbidae gen. & sp.)

This species, which hasn’t yet been described, is known only from subfossil remains that were recovered from archeological sites on the island of Buka in the northernmost part of the Solomon Islands group.

The species very likely was flightless and was probably among the first bird species to be eradicated by the first human settlers on the island.

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References:  

[1] David W. Steadman: Extinction and biogeography of Tropical Pacific Birds. University of Chicago Press 2006

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edited: 19.08.2022

Megapodius sp. ‘Buka’

Buka Island Megapode (Megapodius sp.)

This undescribed form is known from subfossil remains, found on the island of Buka in the northernmost part of the Solomon Islands.

The form may also have occurred on others of the Solomon Islands. [1]

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References:

[1] David W. Steadman: Extinction and Biogeography of Tropical Pacific Birds. University of Chicago Press 2006

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edited: 21.03.2018

Cacatua sp. ‘New Ireland’

New Ireland Cockatoo (Cacatua sp.)

This form is known only from subfossil remains that had been found on the island of New Ireland in the Bismarck Archipelago of Papua New Guinea.

The New Ireland Cockatoo was more or less similar to to the Blue-eyed Cockatoo (Cacatua ophthalmica Sclater) (see photo) from the neighboring island of New Britain, but was somewhat stouter built. [1]

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References:

[1] David W. Steadman: Extinction and Biogeography of Tropical Pacific Birds. University of Chicago Press 2006

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Blue-eyed Cockatoo (Cacatua ophthalmica)

Depiction from: ‘Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London, 1862’

(public domain)

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edited: 18.06.2019