Tag Archives: Pleuroceridae

Athearnia crassa (Haldeman)

Boulder Snail (Athearnia crassa)

The Boulder Snail was described in 1842; it inhabited the Clinch- and the Powell rivers which are a part of a river system that spans over parts of Georgia, Iowa and Tennessee, USA.

The species is now extinct, the last remaining population of this species disappeared when the Tellico River was dammed in 1979 to create Lake Tellico.

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The Boulder Snail is sometimes considered rediscovered, however, these accounts must be assigned to a closely related species, Anthony’s Boulder Snail (Athearnia anthonyi (Redfield)).

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edited: 14.11.2021

Leptoxis ligata (Anthony)

Rotund Rocksnail (Leptoxis ligata)  

This species was described in 1860.  

The Rotund Rocksnail was endemic to the Coosa River system in Alabama, USA, where it was restricted to the middle and lower reaches.  

The shells reached sizes of about 1,3 cm.  

The species disappeared after the impoundment of the river by the building of dams and is now considered extinct.  

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Photo: Joop Trausel and Frans Slieker; by courtesy of Frans Slieker  

Natural History Museum Rotterdam 
http://www.nmr-pics.nl

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edited: 04.11.2017

Leptoxis lirata (H. H. Smith)

Lirate Rocksnail (Leptoxis lirata 

This species was described in 1922.  

The Lirate Rocksnail or Lyrate Rocksnail was restricted to the middle reaches of the Coosa River in Alabama, USA.  

The species disappeared after the impoundment of the river by the building of dams and is now extinct.  

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edited: 04.11.2017

Gyrotoma lewisii (Lea)

Striate Slitsnail (Gyrotoma lewisii)

The Striate Slitsnail was described in 1869, like all members of its genus, it was endemic to the Coosa River in Alabama, USA and disappeared after the impoundment of the river system in the early 20th century.

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Depiction from: ‘Calvin Goodrich: The genus Gyrotoma. University of Michigan 1924’

(public domain)

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edited: 07.05.2019

Leptoxis formosa (I. Lea)

Maiden Rocksnail (Leptoxis formosa 

This species was described in 1860.  

The Maiden Rocksnail was endemic to the Coosa River system in Alabama, USA, where it was restricted to the upper and middle reaches some of the tributaries.  

The shells reached sizes of about 1,5 cm.  

The species disappeared after the impoundment of the river by the building of dams and is now considered extinct.  

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Photo: Joop Trausel and Frans Slieker; by courtesy of Frans Slieker  

Natural History Museum Rotterdam 
http://www.nmr-pics.nl 

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edited: 04.11.2017

Gyrotoma excisa (Lea)

Excited Slitsnail (Gyrotoma excisa)

The Excited Slitsnail was described in 1843, it was endemic to the Coosa River in Alabama, USA and disappeared at the beginning of the 20th century when the rivers system was impounded. 

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Depiction from: ‘Calvin Goodrich: The genus Gyrotoma. University of Michigan 1924’

(public domain)

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edited: 07.05.2019

Gyrotoma pagoda (Lea)

Pagoda Slitsnail (Gyrotoma pagoda)

The Pagoda Slitsnail was described in 1845, it was endemic to the middle flow of the Coosa River in Alabama, USA.

The species died out, together with its five congeneric siblings, following the impondment of the river at the beginning of the 20th century.

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Depiction from: ‘Calvin Goodrich: The genus Gyrotoma. University of Michigan 1924’

(public domain)

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edited: 07.05.2019

Elimia pupaeformis (I. Lea)

Pupa Elimia Snail (Elimia pupaeformis)  

This species was described in 1864.  

The Pupa Elimia Snail was restricted to a section of the Coosa River, from about Elmore – to St. Clair County, Alabama.  

The species disappeared after the impoundment of the river due to the building of dams and is now considered extinct.  

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edited: 06.11.2017

Elimia brevis (Reeve)

Short-spired Elimia Snail (Elimia brevis)  

This species was described in 1860.  

The Short-spired Elimia Snail was endemic to the middle and lower reaches of Coosa River in Alabama, USA.  

The species was not reported since the river was impounded, and is now considered extinct.  

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Photo: University of Michigan Museum of Zoology  

(public domain) 

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edited: 02.11.2017