Tag Archives: Tenerife

Hydroporus pilosus (Guignot)

Pilose Diving Beetle (Hydroporus pilosus)

The Pilose Diving Beetle was described in 1949; it inhabits, or rather inhabited, streams on the islands of Gran Canaria and Tenerife in the Canary Islands.

The species reaches a length of 0,28 to 0,32 cm; it is broadly ovate in shape and brownish black in color.

The Pilose Diving Beetle was not found during recent field studies and might be extinct. [1]

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syn. Hydrotarsus pilosus Guignot

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References:

[1] Volker Lüderitz; José Ramón Arévalo; José María Fernández-Palacios; Silvia Fernández-Lugo; Katharina Eller; Uta Langheinrich: Freshwater endemic species and the ecological status of streams in the Canary Islands. Journal of Mediterranean Ecology 14: 45-54. 2016

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edited: 17.11.2021

Xerotricha garachicoensis (Wollaston)

Garachico Snail (Xerotricha garachicoensis)

The Garachico Snail was described in 1878; it is only known only from some specimens that were collected in 1861 from around Garachico, a city in northern Tenerife, Canary Islands.

In its general size and hue, as well as in the proportion of its umbilicus, the P. garachicoensis has also, at first sight, a little in common with the P. Bertholdiana, Pfeiff., from the Cape Verdes. It is, however, more flattened and discoidal than that species (or less lenticular), its surface is more strongly and roughly sculptured, and, although the spire is much depressed, its volutions are nevertheless more tumid, – the basal one moreover being quite free from the slightest trace of a keel.” [1]

The habitat in the original locality has drastically changed since the 19th century and the species has not been recorded since its description and might well be extinct.

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References:

[1] T. Vernon Wollaston: Testacea Atlantica: or the Land and Freshwater Shells of the Azores, Madeiras, Salvages, Canaries, Cape Verdes, and Saint Helena. London: L. Reeve & Co. 1878
[2] David T. Holyoak; Geraldine A. Holyoak; Yurena Yanes; Maria R. Alonso; Miguel Ibáñez: Taxonomic revision, habitats and biogeography of the land snail family Discidae (Gastropoda: Pulmonata) in the Canary Islands. Journal of Conchology 40(6): 583-603. 2011

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edited: 12.05.2022

Emberiza alcoveri Rando, Lopez & Segui

Long-legged Bunting (Emberiza alcoveri)

This species was described based on subfossil remains that had been found on the island of Tenerife, Canary Islands.

The Long-legged Bunting had very long legs and short wings, which indicate that the species may even have been flightless, if so it would have been one of only a very, very few passerines that lost their flight abilities.

The species disappeared shortly after the Canary Islands were settled by the Guanches at around 1000 BCE.

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edited: 17.04.2019

Leiostyla castanea (Shuttleworth)

Chestnut-colored Helmet Snail (Leiostyla castanea)  

The Chestnut-colored Helmet Snail was described in the year 1852, it appears to be or have been endemic to the island of Tenerife, Canary Islands.  

The species was known to occur in damp places near Garachico, a town on the northern coast of Tenerife.  

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See Thomas Vernon Wollaston in the year 1878 (Testacea Atlantica).:  

Mr. Lowe’s examples of this very distinct Pupa were taken, during April of 1861, above Garachico, in the north of Teneriffe, – namely adhering to wet rocks and sodden leaves, in the drip of a small waterfall ….” [1]  

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The Chestnut-colored Helmet Snail was never recorded again since 1878 and appears to be extinct.  

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References:  

[1] T. Vernon Wollaston: Testacea Atlantica: or the Land and Freshwater Shells of the Azores, Madeiras, Salvages, Canaries, Cape Verdes, and Saint Helena. London: L. Reeve & Co. 1878  

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Depiction from: ‘George W. Tryon; Henry A. Pilsbry; a.o.: Manual of Conchology. Second Series: Pulmonata Vol. 27, Pupillidae (Orculinae, Pagodulinae, Acanthinulinae, etc.). 1922-1926’  

(public domain)

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edited: 17.01.2011