Tag Archives: Hylidae

Plectrohyla siopela (Duellman)

Voiceless Treefrog (Plectrohyla siopela)

The Voiceless Treefrog was described in 1968, it was restricted to the western slope of the Cofre de Perote Mountain in the Sierra Madre Oriental in central Veracruz, Mexico, where the frogs inhabited dry pine forests spending the days hidden in crevices and under rocks behind small cascades of mountain streams.

The species reached a length of 4 to 5 cm, with the females being slightly larger than the males

The Voiceless Treefrog was once abundant but has not been seen since around 2010 and is now feared to have gone extinct.

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edited: 13.09.2019

Ecnomiohyla rabborum Mendelson, Savage, Griffith, Ross, Kubicki & Gagliardo

Rabb’s Fringe-limbed Treefrog (Ecnomiohyla rabborum)  

Rabb’s Fringe-limbed Treefrog, described in 2008, was only ever known from a single locality in Panama.

The species reached sizes of up to 10 cm.

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The wild population of this species collapsed shortly after its discovery in 2005 due to chytridiomycosis, which killed countless amphibian populations across Central America.  

The species was considered functionally extinct since the 2010s because at that time there was apparently only one single specimen left, a male that was kept in the Botanical Garden of the city of Atlanta in Georgia, USA. 

This last known member of its species (see photo), however, died today, September 26, 2016, thus this species is now indeed fully extinct.

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Photo: Brian Gratwicke  

(under creative commons license (2.0)) 
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0


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edited: 18.09.2020

Ecnomiohyla echinata (Duellman)

Oaxaca Mountainforest Tree Frog (Ecnomiohyla echinata 

The Oaxaca Mountainforest Tree Frog is known only from the type locality, the cloud forest at an elevation of about 2000 m at the northern slopes of the Sierra de Juárez Mountains in Oaxaca, Mexican.  

The species was last recorded in the year 1962, and is considered most probably extinct.  

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edited: 27.05.2019