Tag Archives: Carabidae

Blackburnia rugosa Liebherr & Porch

Rugose Blackburnia Ground Beetle (Blackburnia rugosa)

The Rugose Blackburnia Ground Beetle was described in 2015, it is known only from several subfossil remains that had been found in the deposits of the Makauwahi Cave on the island of Kaua’i, Hawaiian Islands.

The species reached a size of about 0,8 to 1,1 cm and is distinguished from its congeners by its robust sclerotization. [1]

*********************

References:

[1] James K. Liebherr; Nick Porch: Reassembling a lost lowland carabid beetle assemblage (Coleoptera) from kauai, Hawaiian Islands. Invertebrate Systematics 29: 191-213. 2015

*********************

edited: 03.09.2019

Blackburnia agonoides (Sharp)

Koa Blackburnia Ground Beetle (Blackburnia agonoides)

The Koa Blackburnia Ground Beetle was described in 1903, it was endemic to the island of Maui, Hawaiian Islands.

The species was recorded from cavities in trunks or branches of the endemic Koa (Acacia koa A. Gray). [1]

********************* 

References: 

[1] Dan A. Polhemus; Curtis P. Ewing; R. Kaholo’a, James K. Liebherr: Rediscovery of Blackburnia anomala (Coleoptera: Carabidae), in East Maui, Hawai’i, after a 107-year hiatus. Pacific Science 57(2): 16-166. 2003

*********************

edited: 03.09.2019

Blackburnia koebelei (Sharp)

Koebele’s Blackburnia Ground Beetle (Blackburnia koebelei)

Koebele’s Blackburnia Ground Beetle was described in 1903, it was endemic to the western part of the island of Maui, Hawaiian Islands.

The species was not recorded during recent field surveys and might very well be extinct.

********************* 

References: 

[1] James K. Liebherr: Hawaiian Blackburnia beetles (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Platynini): Patterns of specialization with implications for conservation. Mitteilungen der Deutschen Gesellschaft für allgemeine und angewendete Entomologie 15: 57-62. 2006

*********************

edited: 02.09.2019

Bryanites graeffei Liebherr

Graeffe’s Groud Beetle (Bryanites graeffei)

Graeffe’s Ground Beetle was described in 2017 based on a single male specimen that had been collected sometimes between 1862 and 1870 on the mountains near Apia, the capital of Samoa on the island of ‘Upolu. This specimen was housed in the Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle, Paris, France and was only recently rediscovered.

The species is about 1,6 cm long.

Graeffe’s Ground Beetle has never been recorded since the collection of the type and is almost certainly extinct. [1]

*********************

References:

[1] James K. Liebherr: Bryanites graeffei sp. n. (Colepotera, Carabidae): Museum rediscovery of a relict species from Samoa. Zoosystematics and Evolution 93(1): 1-11. 2017

*********************

Photo from: ‘James K. Liebherr: Bryanites graeffei sp. n. (Colepotera, Carabidae): museum rediscovery of a reict species from Samoa. Zoosystematics and Evolution 93(1): 1-11. 2017’

(under creative commons license (4.0))
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

*********************

edited: 05.05.2022

Blackburnia perkinsi (Sharp)

Perkins’ Blackburnia Ground Beetle (Blackburnia perkinsi)

Perkins’ Blackburnia Ground Beetle was described in 1903, it was endemic to the island of Moloka’i, Hawaiian Islands.

The species was not found during recent surveys and is very likely extinct. [1]

********************* 

References: 

[1] James K. Liebherr: Hawaiian Blackburnia beetles (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Platynini): Patterns of specialization with implications for conservation. Mitteilungen der Deutschen Gesellschaft für allgemeine und angewendete Entomologie 15: 57-62. 2006

*********************

edited: 03.09.2019

Carabidae gen. & sp. ‘Rodrigues’

Rodrigues Ground Beetle(s) (Carabidae gen. & sp.)

The subfossil record of the island of Rodrigues, Mascarene Islands held about two or three genera of now extinct platyine carabid beetles.

These species were members of a now completely extinct and still almost unknown insect fauna that disappeared shortly after the islands were settled by European settlers and their livestock.

*********************

edited: 31.10.2020

Tachys caheni (Basilewski)

Cahen’s Ground Beetle (Tachys caheni)

Cahen’s Ground Beetle was described in 1972, it is, or maybe was, endemic to the island of Saint Helena.

The species was last seen in 1967 and is probably extinct like so many other insect species that inhabited that island.

***

I have to admit that I could not find any additional information about this certain species.

*********************

edited: 07.05.2021

Trechus roanicus Barr

Roan Mountain Ground Beetle (Trechus roanicus)

The Roan Mountain Ground Beetle was described in 1962, it was originally only known from its type locality, Roan High Bluff, the highest point on Roan Mountain in Tennessee, USA.

The species apparently is thought to occur in North Carolina as well, but I have no further information about that. [1]

The Roan Mountain Ground Beetle is considered possibly extinct.

*********************

References:

[1] Thomas C. Barr Jr.: Revision of Appalachian Trechus (Coleoptera: Carabidae). Brimleyana 2: 29-75. 1979

*********************

edited: 07.09.2020

Blackburnia haleakala Liebherr & Zimmerman

Haleakala Blackburnia Ground Beetle (Blackburnia haleakala)

The Haleakala Blackburnia Ground Beetle was described in 2000, it was endemic to the eastern part of the island of Maui, Hawaiian Islands.

The species was recorded on the ground under dead wood. [1]

********************* 

References: 

[1] Dan A. Polhemus; Curtis P. Ewing; R. Kaholo’a, James K. Liebherr: Rediscovery of Blackburnia anomala (Coleoptera: Carabidae), in East Maui, Hawai’i, after a 107-year hiatus. Pacific Science 57(2): 16-166. 2003

*********************

edited: 03.09.2019

Bembidion trechoides Wollaston

Trechus-like Bembidion Ground Beetle (Bembidion trechoides)

The Trechus-like Bembidion Ground Beetle was described in 1877; it is, or rather was, restricted to the island of Saint Helena in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean.:

It is only on the lofty central ridge that I have observed the B. trechoides, – where, however, in damp places generally, amongst the cabbage trees and tree ferns, it is not particularly uncommon, on the densely-covered slopes about Actaeon and Diana’s Peak; but I did not meet with it in the more western and rather less elevated parts towards High Peak and West Lodge, where the B. sublimbatum would seem to occur.” [1]

***

The species was apparently not found during the latest field searches and might be extinct.

*********************

References:

[1] T. Vernon Wollaston: Coleoptera Sanctae-Helenae. London: John Van Voorst, Paternoster Row 1877

*********************

Photo: The Trustees of the Natural History Museum, London

(under creative commons license (4.0))
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

*********************

edited: 30.05.2021

Blackburnia menehune Liebherr & Porch

Menehune Blackburnia Ground Beetle (Blackburnia menehune)

The Menehune Blackburnia Ground Beetle was described in 2015, it is known from several subfossil remains, mainly head capsules and elytra, that had been recovered from the deposits of the Makauwahi Cave on the island of Kaua’i, Hawaiian Islands. [1]

********************* 

References: 

[1] James K. Liebherr; Nick Porch: Reassembling a lost lowland carabid beetle assemblage (Coleoptera) from Kauai, Hawaiian Islands. Invertebrate Systematics 29: 191-213. 2015

*********************

edited: 03.09.2019

Lacordairia fugax (Olliff)

Swift Lord Howe Ground Beetle (Lacordairia fugax)

The Swift Lord Howe Ground Beetle was described in 1889; it was endemic to Lord Howe Island, Australia.

The species reached a length of about 1,3 cm; it was “Elongate-ovate, dark piceous, shining, sometimes with a bluish tinge; elytra strongly striate, the interstices rather narrow, plain; antennae (except the basal joint) and palpi reddish testaceous; legs rufo-piceous.
Head narrow; eyes rather prominent. Antennae more than two-thirds the length of the body, the basal joint piceous. Prothorax narrowed behind, with a distinct median line; the sides rounded in front; posterior angles rounded: Elytra oblong-ovate, very slightly contracted before the middle, strongly and regularly striate, the interstices narrow and smooth, the second stria, on each side, with an obscure puncture before the middle; sides slightly sinuate before the apex. Legs rather long.
” [1]

The Swift Lord Howe Ground Beetle was last recorded before 1900 and is now considered extinct. [2]

*********************

References:

[1] Sidney Olliff: The insect fauna of Lord Howe Island. The Australian Museum memoir 2: 75-98. 1889
[2] Department of Environment and Climate Change (NSW), Lord Howe Island Biodiversity Management Plan Appendices, Department of Environment and Climate Change (NSW), Sydney 2007

*********************

edited: 26.04.2022

Blackburnia blaptoides (Blackburn)

Konahuanui Blackburnia Ground Beetle (Blackburnia blaptoides)

The Konahuanui Blackburnia Ground Beetle was described in 1878, it was apparently restricted to the Pu’u Konahuanui, the tallest peak of the Ko’olau Range on the island of O’ahu, Hawaiian Islands.

The species is thought to be extinct due to predation by introduced ants. [1]

********************* 

References: 

[1] James K. Liebherr: Hawaiian Blackburnia beetles (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Platynini): Patterns of specialization with implications for conservation. Mitteilungen der Deutschen Gesellschaft für allgemeine und angewendete Entomologie 15: 57-62. 2006

*********************

edited: 03.09.2019

Bradycellus chavesi Alluaud

Chaves’ Ground Beetle (Bradycellus chavesi)

This species was described in 1919 based on a single female specimen that was collected on the island of São Miguel in the Azores.

Chaves’ Ground Beetle appears to have had very reduced hindwings and thus was apparently flightless.

The species was never found again since its description and is considered extinct. [1][2]

*********************

References:

[1] Sofia Terzopulou; François Rigal; Robert J. Whittaker; Paulo A. V. Borges; Kostas A. Triantis: Drivers of Extinction: the case of Azorean beetles. Biological Letters 11(6): 1-32. 2015
[2] Paulo Alexandre Vieira Borges; Lucas Lamelas-López; Isabel R. Amorim; Anja Danielczak; Rui Nunes; Artur R.M. Serrano; Mário Boieiro; Carla Rego; Axel Hochkirch; Virgílio Vieira: Conservation status of the forest beetles (Insecta: Coleoptera) from the Azores, Portugal. Biodiversity Data Journal 5: e14557. 2017

*********************

edited: 04.12.2018

Trechus luculentus ssp. unicoi Barr

Unicoi Mountains Ground Beetle (Trechus luculentus ssp. unicoi)

The Unicoi Mountains Ground Beetle was described in 1979, this subspecies of the Luminous Ground Beetle (Trechus luculentus Barr) is known only from the type locality, Stratton Meadows a place that extends from Monroe County, Tennessee to Graham County in North Carolina, USA. [1]

This form is considered possibly extinct.

*********************

References:

[1] Thomas C. Barr Jr.: Revision of Appalachian Trechus (Coleoptera: Carabidae). Brimleyana 2: 29-75. 1979

*********************

edited: 07.09.2020

Blackburnia micantipennis (Sharp)

Waimea Blackburnia Ground Beetle (Blackburnia micantipennis)  

The Waimea Blackburnia Ground Beetle was described in 1903, it occurred only at elevations of 600 to 1270 m on the leeward reaches of the Waimea Canyon on the island of Kaua’i, Hawaiian Islands. It is thought to have been a riparian species, since all localities, at which this species was found, are along the tributaries of the Waimea River.  

The last specimens of this species were apparently collected in 1935 and it is now thought to be possibly extinct. [1]  

********************* 

References: 

[1] J. K. Liebherr; E. C. Zimmerman: Insects of Hawaii: Hawaiian Carabidae (Coleoptera), Part 1: Introduction and Tribe Platynini. University of Hawaii Press 2000

*********************

edited: 03.09.2019

Bembidion rufosuffusus Wollaston

Reddish-tinged Bembidion Ground Beetle (Bembidion rufosuffusus)

The Reddish-tinged Bembidion Ground Beetle was described in 1877; it is, or maybe was, restricted to the island of Saint Helena. 

Like its immediate allies, this little Bembidium is of great rarity, and confined (so far as I have observed) to the high central ridge,  – where it occurs generally (though not always) beneath the moist stems of the rotten tree ferns about Diana’s Peak and Actaeon.” [1]

***

The species appears to have not been relocated during the most recent field studies and is thus believed to be possibly extinct.

*********************

References:

[1] T. Vernon Wollaston: Coleoptera Sanctae-Helenae. London: John Van Voorst, Paternoster Row 1877

*********************

Photo: David Maddison 

(under creative commons license (4.0))
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

*********************

edited: 30.05.2021

Blackburnia mothra Liebherr & Porch

Mothra Blackburnia Ground Beetle (Blackburnia mothra)

This species was described in 2015, it is one of several, mostly very large ground beetle species that are known exclusively from subfossil remains found in the makauwahi Cave on the island of Kaua’i, Hawaiian Islands.

The Mothra Blackburnia Ground is the second-largest member of its genus, it died out shortly after the arrival of the first Polynesians on the Hawaiian Islands. [1]

********************* 

References: 

[1] James K. Liebherr; Nick Porch: Reassembling a lost lowland carabid beetle assemblage (Coleoptera) from Kauai, Hawaiian Islands. Invertebrate Systematics 29: 191-213. 2015

*********************

edited: 03.09.2019

Blackburnia godzilla Liebherr & Porch

Godzilla Blackburnia Ground Beetle (Blackburnia godzilla)

This species was described in 2015, the species is known from several subfossil remains that had been excavated from the deposits of the Makauwahi Cave on the island of Kaua’i, Hawaiian Islands.

The Godzilla Blackburnia Ground Beetle is the largest species of its genus, it might have reached sizes of over 4 cm. [1]

********************* 

References: 

[1] James K. Liebherr; Nick Porch: Reassembling a lost lowland carabid beetle assemblage (Coleoptera) from Kauai, Hawaiian Islands. Invertebrate Systematics 29: 191-213. 2015

*********************

edited: 12.02.2020

Blackburnia ovata Liebherr & Porch

Ovate Blackburnia Ground Beetle (Blackburnia ovata)

The Ovate Blackburnia Ground Beetle was described in 2015, the species is known from three subfossil pronota that had been recovered from the deposits of the Makauwahi Cave on the island of Kaua’i, Hawaiian Islands. [1]

********************* 

References: 

[1] James K. Liebherr; Nick Porch: Reassembling a lost lowland carabid beetle assemblage (Coleoptera) from Kauai, Hawaiian Islands. Invertebrate Systematics 29: 191-213. 2015

*********************

edited: 03.09.2019

Trechus subtilis Barr

Fine Ground Beetle (Trechus subtilis 

The Fine Ground Beetle was described in 1962, it is known only from its type locality, Mt. Sterling in Haywood County, North Carolina, USA; apparently only nine specimens have ever been collected. [1]

The species is considered possibly extinct now.
 
*********************

References:

[1] Thomas C. Barr Jr.: Revision of Appalachian Trechus (Coleoptera: Carabidae). Brimleyana 2: 29-75. 1979

*********************

edited: 07.09.2020

Trechus carolinae Schaeffer

Carolina Ground Beetle (Trechus carolinae)

The Carolina Ground Beetle was described in 1901, it apparently is known only from its type locality, Mt. Mitchell in Yancey County, North Carolina, USA.

The species reaches a size of up to 0,5 cm. [1]

The Carolina Ground Beetle is considered likely extinct.

*********************

References:

[1] Thomas C. Barr Jr.: Revision of Appalachian Trechus (Coleoptera: Carabidae). Brimleyana 2: 29-75. 1979

*********************

edited: 07.09.2020

Bembidion megalops (Wollaston)

Large-eyed Bembidion Ground Beetle (Bembidion megalops)  

The Large-eyed Bembidion Ground Beetle was described in the year 1877, at a time when it was obviously already very rare.  

See Thomas Vernon Wollaston in the year 1877 (Coleoptera Sanctae-Helenae).:  

It is only within the damp and rotten stems of the old tree ferns that I have observed the B. megalops; and as I merely obtained three examples, it may be presumed to be of the greatest rarity. They were all found on the lofty, densely-wooded central ridge, in the neighbourhood of Actaeon and Diana’s Peak.”  

***

The most recent searches in the years of 2005 to 2006 were unsuccessful, and the species must be considered most likely extinct.  

*********************  

References:  

[1] T. V. Wollaston: Coleoptera Sanctae-Helenae. London: John Van Voorst, Paternoster Row 1877
[2] H. Mendel; P. Ashmole; M. Ashmole: Invertebrates of the Central Peaks and Peak Dale, St Helena. 2008  

*********************

Photo: David Maddison 

(under creative commons license (4.0))
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

********************* 

edited: 30.05.2021

Trechus novaculosus Barr

Clingmans Dome Ground Beetle (Trechus novaculosus)

This species, described in 1962, was restricted to its type locality, Clingmans Dome in Sevier County in Tennessee, USA. [1]

The species is thought to have also occurred in North carolina, however, I’m unable to find any additional information.

The species is thought to be extinct now.

*********************

References:

[1] Thomas C. Barr Jr.: Revision of Appalachian Trechus (Coleoptera: Carabidae). Brimleyana 2: 29-75. 1979

*********************

edited: 07.09.2020

Bembidion platyderoides Wollaston

Chestnut-brown Bembidion Ground Beetle (Bembidion platyderoides)  

The Chestnut-brown Bembidion Ground Beetle was described in 1877.  

The author of the species already mentions its rarity.:  

The unique example of the very singular Bembidium which I have above enunciated was taken by myself from the interior of the fibrous stem of a rotten tree fern [Dicksonia arborescens L’Hér.] obtained near Diana’s Peak on the lofty central ridge; and there can be no doubt that the species which it represents is of the utmost rarity.” [1]  

***

The Chestnut-brown Bembidion Ground Beetle reaches a length of about 0,45 cm.  

***

The species was not found during the most recent field searches and is thus feared to be extinct. [2]  

*********************  

References:  

[1] T. V. Wollaston: Coleoptera Sanctae-Helenae. London: John Van Voorst, Paternoster Row 1877 
[2] H. Mendel; P. Ashmole; M. Ashmole: Invertebrates of the Central Peaks and Peak Dale, St Helena. 2008  

*********************

Photo: David Maddison 

(under creative commons license (4.0))
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

*********************

edited: 30.05.2021

Blackburnia terebrata (Blackburn)

Terebra-bearing Blackburnia Ground Beetle (Blackburnia terebrata)

The Terebra-bearing Blackburnia Ground Beetle was described in 1881, it was endemic to the eastern part of the island of Maui, Hawaiian Islands.

The species is known to have been one of the species associated with the formerly abundant but now mostly absent endemic koa forest, it was recorded under stones or logs outside the koa forest. [1][2][3]

********************* 

References: 

[1] Dan A. Polhemus; Curtis P. Ewing; R. Kaholo’a, James K. Liebherr: Rediscovery of Blackburnia anomala (Coleoptera: Carabidae), in East Maui, Hawai’i, after a 107-year hiatus. Pacific Science 57(2): 16-166. 2003
[2] James K. Liebherr: Hawaiian Blackburnia beetles (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Platynini): Patterns of specialization with implications for conservation. Mitteilungen der Deutschen Gesellschaft für allgemeine und angewendete Entomologie 15: 57-62. 2006
[3] James K. Liebherr: The mecyclothorax beetles (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Moriomorphini) of Haleakala-, Maui: Keystone of a hyperdiverse Hawaiian radiation. Zookeys 544: 1-407. 2015 

*********************

edited: 03.09.2019

Bembidion nubigena Wollaston

Large St. Helena Bembidion Ground Beetle (Bembidion nubigena)  

The Large St. Helena Bembidion Ground Beetle was described in 1877, it reached a length of about 0,6 cm and was thus the largest member of its genus on the island of Saint Helena.  

The author of the species already mentions its rarity in 1877.:  

This is the largest of the St.-Helena Bembidia, and one which there can be little doubt is extremely rare, – the only two examples which I have seen having been taken on the lofty central ridge, on the ascent of the peak known as Actaeon.” [1]  

***

The specimens were found beneath rotting stems of the endemic St. Helena Tree Fern (Dicksonia arborescens L’Hér.).  

***

The Large St. Helena Bembidion Ground Beetle could not be located during the most recent field searches and is thus feared to be extinct. [2]  

*********************  

References:  

[1] T. V. Wollaston: Coleoptera Sanctae-Helenae. London: John Van Voorst, Paternoster Row 1877 
[2] H. Mendel; P. Ashmole; M. Ashmole: Invertebrates of the Central Peaks and Peak Dale, St Helena. 2008  

*********************

Photo: David Maddison 

(under creative commons license (4.0))
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

*********************

edited: 30.05.2021

Aplothorax burchelli Waterhouse

Burchell’s Giant Ground Beetle (Aplothorax burchelli)

Burchell’s Giant Ground Beetle was described in 1841, it was endemic to the island of Saint Helena which lies isolated in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean.

The species was completely flightless, it reached a length of 3,8 cm making it the largest of the island’s beetle species.

Burchell’s Giant Ground Beetle had been considered extinct by the end of the 19th century when in 1967 both, adult beetles as well as larvae were found. This rediscovery, however, also marks the last confirmed sighting of this species, because no additional individuals were ever found again since and the species is now clearly extinct. [1][2]

*********************  

References:  

[1] T. Vernon Wollaston: Coleoptera Sanctae-Helenae. London: John Van Voorst, Paternoster Row 1877 
[2] Howard Mendel; Philip Ashmole; Myrtle Ashmole: Invertebrates of the Central Peaks and Peak Dale, St. Helena. Report for the St Helena National Trust, Jamestown 2008

*********************

Depiction from: ‘John Charles Meliss: St. Helena: A Physical, Historical, and Topographical Description of the Island, including its Geology, Fauna, Flora, and Meteorology. London: L. Reeve & Co. 1875’  

(public domain)

*********************

edited: 19.06.2020

Blackburnia burneyi Liebherr & Porch

Burney’s Blackburnia Ground Beetle (Blackburnia burneyi)

Burney’s Blackburnia Ground Beetle was described in 2015, it is known only from subfossil elytra that had been recovered from sediments from the Makauwahi Cave on the island of Kaua’i, Hawaiian Islands.

The species is thought to have been macropterous.

Burney’s Blackburnia Ground Beetle apparently was a lowland species and thus was among the first invertebrates to be wiped out by the Pacific Rats (Rattus exulans (Peale)) that had been introduced to the islands by the first Polynesian settlers. [1]

********************* 

References: 

[1] James K. Liebherr; Nick Porch: Reassembling a lost lowland carabid beetle assemblage (Coleoptera) from Kauai, Hawaiian Islands. Invertebrate Systematics 29: 191-213. 2015

*********************

edited: 03.09.2019

Bembidion dicksoniae (Wollaston)

Tree Fern Bembidion Ground Beetle (Bembidion dicksoniae)  

The twelve species of the genus Bembidion, known to occur on Saint Helena, prey on endemic weevil species (Curculionidae), which often are dependent on rotten wood.  

In recent times, however, the climatical conditions in the remaining endemic cloud forests of Saint Helena have changed – less rain led to a much more open canopy, which again led to much drier conditions at ground level, which again seems to be quite detrimetal to the rotting process, leading to a lack of rotten wood.  

***

The Tree Fern Bembidion Ground Beetle was found mostly inside, but sometimes also on the surface of the stems of the Saint Helena Tree Fern (Dicksonia arborescens L’Hér.).  

See also Thomas Vernon Wollaston in the year 1877 (Coleoptera Sanctae-Helenae).:  

The modus vivendi of this Bembidium is precisely similar to that of the preceding and four following ones, – it having been obtained from the interior of the damp fibrous stems of the dead tree ferns on the high central ridge in the vicinity of Diana’s Peak. It is without doubt extremely rare; nevertheless I met with 17 examples of it, from first to last, by bringing amay portions of the old Dicksonias and breaking them up carefully, at home, into small fragments, over a white cloth, – which embodies a far more successful method for securing these Filicophilous Coleoptera than by examining the trunks hastily in situ.”  

***

The most recent searches (2005 to 2006) failed to find any sign of the Tree Fern Bembidion Ground Beetle (and the other endemic Bembidion species), the species is therefore considered very likely extinct.  

*********************  

References:  

[1] T. V. Wollaston: Coleoptera Sanctae-Helenae. London: John Van Voorst, Paternoster Row 1877 
[2] H. Mendel; P. Ashmole; M. Ashmole: Invertebrates of the Central Peaks and Peak Dale, St Helena. 2008 

*********************

Photo: The Trustees of the Natural History Museum, London

(under creative commons license (4.0))
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

*********************

edited: 30.05.2021

Blackburnia octoocellata (Karsch)

Eight-eyed Blackburnia Ground Beetle (Blackburnia octoocellata)

The Eight-eyed Blackburnia Ground Beetle was described in 1881, it was endemic to the island of Maui, Hawaiian Islands.

This beetle is one of several within its genus that are associated with the endemic Koa Acacia (Acacia koa A. Gray) in one way or another, this species for example was recorded under exfoliating bark of the koa.

The nearly complete destruction of large parts of the formerly abundant koa forests lead to a collapse of many populations of endemic invertebrates, some are now completely extinct – like this beetle. [1][2][3]

********************* 

References: 

[1] Dan A. Polhemus; Curtis P. Ewing; R. Kaholo’a, James K. Liebherr: Rediscovery of Blackburnia anomala (Coleoptera: Carabidae), in East Maui, Hawai’i, after a 107-year hiatus. Pacific Science 57(2): 16-166. 2003
[2] James K. Liebherr: Hawaiian Blackburnia beetles (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Platynini): Patterns of specialization with implications for conservation. Mitteilungen der Deutschen Gesellschaft für allgemeine und angewendete Entomologie 15: 57-62. 2006
[3] James K. Liebherr: The Mecyclothorax beetles (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Moriomorphini) of Haleakala-, Maui: Keystone of a hyperdiverse Hawaiian radiation. Zookeys 544: 1-407. 2015

*********************

edited: 03.09.2019

Trechus rosenbergi Barr

Rosenberg’s Ground Beetle (Trechus rosenbergi)

Rosenberg’s Ground Beetle was described in 1962, it is apparently known only from a single locality, the Water Rock Knob in Haywood- and Jackson counties, North Carolina, USA.

The species reached a size of up to 0,5 cm.

Rosenberg’s Ground Beetle is considered most likely extinct.

*********************

References:

[1] Thomas C. Barr Jr.: Revision of Appalachian Trechus (Coleoptera: Carabidae). Brimleyana 2: 29-75. 1979

*********************

edited: 07.09.2020

Blackburnia tantalus (Blackburn)

Tantalus Blackburnia Ground Beetle (Blackburnia tantalus)

The Tantalus Blackburnia Ground Beetle was described in 1877, it was very abundant at that time and was found along both the Ko’olau –  as well as the Wai’anae Mountain Ranges in central O’ahu, Hawaiian Islands.

The species possessed a well-developed flight apparatus, it appears to have not been specialized in any way, most specimens were collected at elevations between 445 to 600 m, mostly in moss mats on tree trunks as well as under the bark of dead trees. 

The Tantalus Blackburnia Ground Beetle was not recorded during any of the more recent surveys and is now feared to be extinct. [1][2]

********************* 

References: 

[1] James K. Liebherr; Dan A. Polhemus: Comparisons to the century before: The legacy of R. C. L. Perkins and Fauna Hawaiiensis as the basis for a long-term ecological monitoring program. Pacific Science 51(4): 490-504. 1997
[2] James K. Liebherr: Hawaiian Blackburnia beetles (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Platynini): Patterns of specialization with implications for conservation. Mitteilungen der Deutschen Gesellschaft für allgemeine und angewendete Entomologie 15: 57-62. 2006 

*********************

edited: 02.09.2019

Blackburnia oceanica (Blackburn)

The Oceanic Blackburnia Ground Beetle (Blackburnia oceanica)

The Oceanic Blackburnia Ground Beetle was described in 1877, the species was endemic to the Ko’olau mountains on the island of O’ahu.

The species was not recorded during recent field surveys and ist thought to be most likely extinct.

********************* 

edited: 02.09.2019 

Trechus luculentus ssp. luculentus Barr

Luminous Ground Beetle (Trechus luculentus ssp. luculentus)

The Luminous Ground Beetle, described in 1962, is apparently restricted to its type locality, Clingmans Dome in Swain County, North Carolina, USA. [1]

The species, respectively this nominate form of it, is considered likely extinct.

*********************

References:

[1] Thomas C. Barr Jr.: Revision of Appalachian Trechus (Coleoptera: Carabidae). Brimleyana 2: 29-75. 1979

*********************

edited: 07.09.2020

Pseudanophthalmus krameri Krekeler

Kramer’s Cave Ground Beetle (Pseudanophthalmus krameri)  

This species was described in 1973, it is known only from its type locality, a cave named Cave Hill Cave, located northwest of West Union, Adams County, Ohio.  

The type series consists of 11 specimens of which 10 were collected in 1960, and one in 1962, the species was not found again since that date, despite eight surveys in 1994 and 1995.  

The species is most likely extinct. [1]  

*********************  

References:  

[1] Yves Bousquet: Catalogue of Geadephaga (Coleoptera, Adephaga) of America, north of Mexico. ZooKeys 245: 1-1722. 2012

*********************

edited: 11.10.2020

Rakantrechus elegans Ueno

Kozono-no-ana Blind Cave Beetle (Rakantrechus elegans)

This species was described in 1960; it was apparently found in a cave named Kozono-no-ana, located in the Ōita Prefecture on the island of Kyushu, Japan.

The type locality is said to have vanished in the 1960s for whatever reasons, thus the species is considered extinct, but it might in fact still exist. [1][2]

*********************

References:

[1] Shun-Ichi Uéno: Occurence of Shikoku representatives of blind trechines (Coleoptera, Trechinae) originated in eastern Kyushu, southwest Japan. Elytra, Tokyo 36(1): 213-225. 2008
[2] Kazuki Sugaya; Ryo Ogawa; Yusuke Hara: Rediscovery of the “extinct” blind ground beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae: Trechinae). Entomological Science 20: 159-162. 2017

*********************

edited: 24.04.2022

Bembidion fossor (Wollaston)

Digging Bembidion Ground Beetle (Bembidion fossor)  

The Digging Bembidion Ground Beetle seems to have been on the edge of extinction already in the 19th century.  

See Thomas Vernon Wollaston in the year 1877 (Coleoptera Sanctae-Helenae).:  

With the exception of the B. evanescens, this is the smallest of the St.-Helena Bembidia; and it is perhaps the rarest of the whole of them, being hitherto unique. My example was taken by myself from the interior of the decayed stem of a tree fern, which I had brought away for after-examination from the vicinity of Diana’s Peak.”  

***

The most recent searches in the years 2005 to 2006 failed to find any trace of this species.  

*********************  

References:  

[1] T. V. Wollaston: Coleoptera Sanctae-Helenae. London: John Van Voorst, Paternoster Row 1877 
[2] H. Mendel; P. Ashmole; M. Ashmole: Invertebrates of the Central Peaks and Peak Dale, St Helena. 2008  

*********************

Photo: The Trustees of the Natural History Museum, London

(under creative commons license (4.0))
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

*********************

edited: 30.05.2021

Bembidion sublimbatus Wollaston

Bordered Bembidion Ground Beetle (Bembidion sublimbatus 

The Bordered Bembidion Ground Beetle, described in 1877, was obviously restricted to a very small area at the Central High Ridge in the center of Saint Helena, where the species appears to have already been rare when it was first discovered.  

Thomas Vernon Wollaston wrote about it in 1877 (Coleoptera Sanctae-Helenae).:  

The only spot in which I have met with this extremely rare Bembidium is towards the western extremity of the great central ridge, immediately above the house known as West Lodge, – where, early in February, I took it, on two or three occasions, at the very edge of the tremendous precipice which overlooks the Sandy-Bay crater. It was found beneath damp wood, leaves, and sticks, amongst shrubs of the Aster gummiferus [Commidendrum robustum ssp. gummiferum (Roxb.) Cronk] and common gorse; and, although it may perhaps be more plentiful on the perfectly inaccessible Aster-clothed slopes below (extending from thence to High Peak), my utmost endeavours enabled me to secure only eight or nine specimens; though as both sexes are well represented, this is more than sufficient for all practical purposes.”  

***

The most recent field searches in 2008 found the type locality of the species being more or less completely eroded, yet did not produce any trace of the beetle itself, which is thus feared to be extinct.  

*********************  

References:  

[1] T. V. Wollaston: Coleoptera Sanctae-Helenae. London: John Van Voorst, Paternoster Row 1877 
[2] H. Mendel; P. Ashmole; M. Ashmole: Invertebrates of the Central Peaks and Peak Dale, St Helena. 2008

*********************

Photo: The Trustees of the Natural History Museum, London

(under creative commons license (4.0))
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

*********************

edited: 30.05.2021

Blackburnia insignis Sharp

Remarkable Ground Beetle (Blackburnia insignis)

The Remarkable Ground Beetle was described in 1878, it was endemic to the island of O’ahu, Hawaiian Islands.

The species is thought to have been completely wiped out by introduced ants. [1]

********************* 

References: 

[1] James K. Liebherr: Hawaiian Blackburnia beetles (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Platynini): Patterns of specialization with implications for conservation. Mitteilungen der Deutschen Gesellschaft für allgemeine und angewendete Entomologie 15: 57-62. 2006

*********************

edited: 03.09.2019

Blackburnia metromenoides (Perkins)

Waianae Blackburnia Ground Beetle (Blackburnia metromenoides)

The Waianae Blackburnia Ground Beetle was described in 1917, it was apparently endemic to the Wai’anae Mountains on the island of O’ahu.

The species was not found during recent field searches and is believed to be extinct.

********************* 

edited: 02.09.2019 

Horologion speokites Valentine

Arbuckle Cave Ground Beetle (Horologion speokites)

The Arbuckle Cave Ground Beetle was described in 1932; it is still known exclusively from the type that was collected one year prior in a cave named Arbuckle Cave, which is supposed to be located in the Greenbrier County of West Virginia, USA.

This species is known only from the holotype collected in a cave three miles north of Lewisburg, near Maxwelton, in southeastern West Virginia. The cave has two rather small rooms connected by a narrow, descending, and tortuous passage. The specimen was found in the lower room, which was wet, muddy, and quite dark.” [1]

The biology of this species is completely unknown, it is not even certain that it is indeed a true cave species; it might now be extinct.

*********************

References:

J. M. Valentine: Horologion, a new genus of cave beetles (fam. Carabidae). Annals of the Entomological Society of America, 25(1): 1-11. 1932

*********************

edited: 07.08.2022

Trechus balsamensis Barr

Balsam Ground Beetle (Trechus balsamensis)

This species was described in 1962, it is, or rather was, apparently restricted to its type locality, a place named Water Rock Knob in Haywood County, North Carolina, USA.

The beetles inhabited spruce-fir forests where they could be found beneath moss carpets. [1]

The species is considered likely extinct.

*********************

References:

[1] Thomas C. Barr Jr.: Revision of Appalachian Trechus (Coleoptera: Carabidae). Brimleyana 2: 29-75. 1979

*********************

edited: 07.09.2020

Cicindela hirticollis ssp. abrupta Casey

Sacramento Valley Hairy-necked Tiger Beetle (Cicindela hirticollis ssp. abrupta)

The Sacramento Valley Hairy-necked Tiger Beetle was described in 1913, it was last recorded in 1984 and is considered extinct, mainly based on extensive statut surveys of all historically known sites and all apparently suitable habitat.

*********************

Hairy-necked Tiger Beetle (Cicindela hirticollis Say); nominate race

Photo from: ‘Victor E. Shelford: Animal Communities in temperate America as illustrated in the Chigaco region; a study in animal ecology. The Geographic Society of Chicago Bulletin 5: 1-362. 1913’

(public domain)

*********************

edited: 07.05.2019

Blackburnia transiens (Sharp)

Ephemeral Ground Beetle (Blackburnia transiens)  

The Ephemeral Ground Beetle was described in 1903, it was endemic to the Makaweli region of the island of Kaua’i, Hawaiian Islands, where it appears to have been restricted to arboreal micro habitats.  

The beetle reached a length of 0,53 to 0,69 cm.  

***

The Ephemeral Ground Beetle was not recorded during recent field works and is considered most probably extinct.  

*********************  

References:  

[1] J. K. Liebherr; E. C. Zimmerman: Insects of Hawaii: Hawaiian Carabidae (Coleoptera), Part 1: Introduction and Tribe Platynini. University of Hawaii Press 2000  

*********************  

edited: 02.09.2019

Cicindela chlorocephala ssp. smythi E. D. Harris

Smyth‘s Tiger Beetle (Cicindela chlorocephala ssp. smythi 

Smyth‘s Tiger Beetle was originally described in 1913 as a species of its own, but is now regarded as a subspecies of the Lime-headed Tiger Beetle (Cicindela chlorocephala Chevrolat).  

The beetle reached a length of about 0,8 cm.  

Smyth‘s Tiger Beetle was restricted to Padre Island, the world’s longest barrier island, located along Texas’ southern coast of the Gulf of Mexico.  

The island’s sand dunes were long used for recreational purposes and much of the beetle’s habitat is now destroyed, it may be already extinct.  

*********************

Depiction from: ‘Edw. Doubleday Harris: Three New Cicindelids. Journal of the New York Entomological Society 21: 67-69. 1913′

(not in copyright)

*********************

edited: 02.10.2020